Posts Tagged ‘dance’

Yvonne Rainer: Dances and Films at the Getty Center

Yvonne Rainer. Yvonne Rainer and John Erdman in This is the story of a woman who… performed at Theater for the New City, New York, 1973, Gelatin silver print, 20.2 x 25.2 cm. The Getty Research Institute. Photo: Babette Mangolte.

Contained within two rooms at the Getty Center is a lifetime’s work by conceptual art, dance, and film pioneer Yvonne Rainer. Dances and Films showcases the Getty’s complete archive of Rainer’s work—with journals, photographs, sketches, choreographic notation, films of performances, and a complete retrospective of her avant-garde films. In our contemporary world, where performance art (and art in general) is dominated by celebrity and personality, it[.....]

Malick Sidibé at Jack Shainman Gallery

Malick Sidibé. Pique-Nique à la Chaussée, 1972/2008; silver gelatin print, 17 x 17 in. (image size). Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Malick Sidibé’s photographs at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York City. Malick Sidibé’s photographs of Mali, Africa, at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, are an ethnographic[.....]

Move: Choreographing You

Move: Choreographing You is an exhibition at Hayward Gallery, London from 13 October 2010 to 9 January 2011 which explores the interaction between contemporary art and dance. The experiments between visual artists such as Robert Morris and Robert Rauschenberg and dancers from Yvonne Rainer to Merce Cunningham in New York in the 1960s led to the insertion of bodily forms and movements into the visual[.....]

Kelly Nipper

The photography, video and performance works of artist Kelly Nipper proclaim the material proof that is inherent to photography and lens-based media at a time when most artists are determined to prove the falsities of the medium. Nipper explores the human relation to time, space and dimension, usually carried out through the choreographed acts of her subjects. The artist often works against normal photographic expectations,[.....]