Posts Tagged ‘Drawing’

Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take at the Walker Art Center

Jim Hodges. on the way between places (21 of 21), 2009; charcoal, saliva on paper; 30 × 22 1/2 in. Photo by Ronald Amstutz ©Jim Hodges.

“I love sculpture. Fundamentally, though, I am a ‘drawer.’ But I love spatial relationships and dimensionality. I’m interested in theatrical moments and choreographing experiences in space. I think as a drawer and make as a sculptor.” —Jim Hodges [1] With butterflies, silk flowers, spiderwebs, mirrors, camouflage, and gold, Jim Hodges draws in space. Constantly assembling and disassembling natural imagery and everyday items, he creates objects[.....]

Andrew Nicholls: The Water Works at Turner Galleries

Australian artist Andrew Nicholls dredges the queasy aesthetics of sentiment for its submerged ideological content. In an ongoing thread of his practice, he locates the ideals and practices of British imperialism in the kitsch, seemingly innocuous world of 19th- and 20th-century ceramics, disrupting this historical narrative with traces of the otherness otherwise repressed in the imperial worldview. He subsumes his viewers in an unsteady undertow[.....]

Maria Lassnig at Capitain Petzel

Maria Lassnig. o.T., (2012), Oil on canvas, 205 x 158 cm. Courtesy of Capitain Petzel, Berlin. Photo: Jens Ziehe.

Maria Lassnig’s current solo exhibition at Capitain Petzel in Berlin takes a quick and investigatory look at her body-awareness paintings. At first glance, Lassnig’s works look crass. She seems to care little for surfaces and even less for her palette: lumpy, grayish figures lie casually upon the surface of the canvas, craftsmanship is squandered, and colors are straight out of the tube. However, at the back of[.....]

Tracey Emin at Lehmann Maupin: The Carry

Tracey Emin’s work presents an unfiltered and often embarrassingly personal view of emotional pain. It reflects the kind of desperate or careless narcissism that is the territory of the depressed. Emin is concerned with the primacy of her own experience—and the narrative of her own sadness is the unabashed subject of her work. Emin’s oeuvre has always felt most valuable to me in terms of[.....]

Thukral & Tagra: Windows of Opportunity

Windows of Opportunity (2013), Jiten Thukral’s and Sumir Tagra’s (branded as Thukral & Tagra) latest show at Art Plural gallery, gives expression to the cacophonous spectacle of hybridity that defines contemporary India, a site that they deem to be a hotbed of conflicted histories and global transactions. These issues of societal flux are explored in their oeuvre through an eclectic visual language composed of cartoonish[.....]

Ronald Ventura: Recyclables

Ronald Ventura’s latest suite of works, produced at the Singapore Tyler Print Institute, examines how humanity relates to the environment, and how we often leave in our wake, a trail of destruction. Recyclables is Ventura’s show of lithographs, cast paper sculptures and paper relief on canvas produced from the discarded waste of urbanity, which he has recycled into a visual mélange of apocalyptic tales drawn[.....]

Art & Vexation: Interview with William Powhida

William Powhida, Oligopoly (Revised), 2011. Watercolor, acrylic ink, and colored pencil on panel

William Powhida’s text-based drawings* skewer the contemporary art world with relish. From fake Rolling Stone magazine pages to charts explaining economic relationships, or trompe l’oeil pages torn from the notebook of an art-world malcontent, Powhida sticks his finger into the wounds of modern culture. For example, What Do Prices Reflect? (2011) pessimistically lists the rationale used to determine an artwork’s financial value: “Whether or not[.....]