Posts Tagged ‘Elisheva Biernoff’

Work in Progress: Considering Utopia at Contemporary Jewish Museum

Oded Hirsch. 50 Blue, 2009; single channel video w/sound, 12:30. Courtesy of Contemporary Jewish Museum

Today from our partners at Art Practical we bring you a review of Work in Progress: Considering Utopia at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco. Author Mary Anne Kluth notes, “The exhibition as a whole positions art as a space to think through, test, and potentially develop goal-oriented models of human interaction.” This article was originally published on January 7, 2014. The three artists in Work in Progress:[.....]

Work in Progress: Approaching Utopia at the Contemporary Jewish Museum

Elisheva Biernoff, The Tools Are in Your Hands, 2013. Steel, acrylic latex, magnets, pprox. 15 ft. 8 in. x 24 ft. Courtesy of the artist and Eli Ridgway. Photo: Johnna Arnold.

From our friends at KQED, today we bring you a review of Work in Progress: Approaching Utopia at the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Author Sarah Hotchkiss notes, “…the exhibition makes an irrefutable argument for the importance of art as a tool of social change. The artists’ models, socially engaged artwork, and narrative experiments approach utopia, question it, and allow viewers to process the larger issues behind collective[.....]

New Histories and Epic Tales:
Better a Live Ass than a Dead Lion at Eli Ridgway Gallery

Standing on a hillside gazing into the Pacific Ocean, one can’t help but to be overwhelmed by the beauty and ruggedness of the landscape. Rolling hills, steep cliffs, and thick forests bring to mind epic stories of western expansion and the conquering spirit of those who have traveled here, a spirit currently under investigation at Eli Ridgway Gallery. Better a Live Ass than a Dead[.....]

101 Collection: Route 2 Undisclosed Destination

Today’s article is from our friends at Art Practical, where Dena Beard discusses the group exhibition Route 2: Undisclosed Location at CCA‘s Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art. Route 2: Undisclosed Destination investigates the idea of a West Coast aesthetic as both a decoy and an impresario. In a truly complex approach by a new curator, location is a curatorial device that situates, and sometimes subsumes,[.....]