Posts Tagged ‘Fan Mail’

Fan Mail: Ben Bigelow

Ben Bigelow. Screen Shot 2014-02-23 at 5.12, 2014; Polaroid instant film; 4 x 4 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Two sets of blinds layered over each other—one horizontal, one vertical, both a brilliant clean white—open and close slowly with nearly imperceptible movement. Like a dancer spinning in an endlessly repeating circle with no clear beginning or end, they move without purpose. When fully open, they form a matrix-like grid of perfect, uniform squares with an infinite series of colors glowing beneath, shifting, chemical, and[…..]

From the Archives – Fan Mail: Rachel Debuque

Rachel Debuque. Cacti-Smash (Performance and Installation), 2013; paint, wood moon cacti, gloves, plastic goggles, test tubes, knife, glass bowl, watch glasses plaster cast moon cacti, plaster cast cat sticks, cast plastic cat stick, aluminum, plastic roofing, extension cords, power strip, fake plants; 8’ x 10’ x 8’ feet. Courtesy of the artist.

As the new year begins, it’s good to have a look back at what we’ve accomplished. Today we return to where we were exactly 365 days ago to rediscover the work of Rachel Debuque, who mixes a theatrical sensibility with a “discomforting internal logic” to create her installations. This article was originally published on January 3, 2014. Rachel Debuque works with myriad subjects and forms. In her[…..]

Best of 2014 – Fan Mail: Wendy Given

Wendy Given. On Myth and Magic No. 5: Eclipse, 2009; C-Print; 17.25” x 26” inches. Photo courtesy of the artist.

For today’s installment of our Best of 2014 series, we have a selection from executive director Patricia Maloney, who writes, “Reading A. Will Brown’s twice-monthly ‘Fan Mail’ series over the past year, one gets a distinct sense of how much fun he has in making his selections and thinking about the work. The opening sentences are often the giveaway: an introduction to the artist by way[…..]

Fan Mail: Marc Newton

Marc Newton. Constructed Paradise: Untitled 17, 2013; archival inkjet print; 17 x 21 inches.  Courtesy the artist.

The waning glow of the warm desert sun hangs in the air around a lone female figure. She sits nestled atop a rock formation amid yellow grasses and low, twisted trees. As she gazes lovingly toward the fading sun with trim arms folded over her legs, a sense of hard-earned and well-deserved calm settles in, as though this communication with the landscape has rejuvenated her[…..]

Fan Mail: Dene Leigh

Dene Leigh. Identify (someone or something) from having encountered before, 2014; oil on linen; 51 x 62 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Dene Leigh paints, constructs, combines, and assembles his work using traditional and old-master techniques to confront the neurological conditions of human memory. With a mixture of found and trompe l’oeil representations of objects, Leigh creates works that push the boundaries of collage, painting, assemblage, and installation. Many of Leigh’s works deal specifically with the neuropsychological disorder called agnosia, which struck Leigh’s grandfather late in life[…..]

Fan Mail: Laura Moore

Laura Moore.  One Man's Junk, (ongoing series) 2014; hand carved Indiana Limestone; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Paul Cimoroni.

From the height of a pedestrian bridge over a railroad track in Toronto, artist Laura Moore saw the remains of a computer monitor gazing screen- or face-up at her from the tracks. The happenstance experience provoked a number of questions about contemporary society’s rapidly changing relationship and progressive entanglement with technology. Mainly the artist wondered: Why was this monitor marched up a steep set of[…..]

Fan Mail: Carlo Speranza

Carlo Speranza. Karlo's Unrealized Works, 2014; 24k gold-leaf on cardboard boxes; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

A kayak that goes only in circles, a disappearing art gallery, a film that begins and ends at the credit sequence, and a set of pure gold nails driven into a gallery wall are just some of Northern Italy-based artist Carlo Speranza’s deceptively clever projects. Speranza, as the previous list implies, works across an exceptionally broad range of mediums; his work is made using wood,[…..]