Posts Tagged ‘Fan Mail’

Fan Mail: Rachel Brumer

Rachel Brumer. Memory’s Main Gate XI, 2008; van dyke on hand dyed pima cotton, acrylic, wax; 22.5” x 29” inches. Image courtesy of Mark Frey.

Transitioning from one distinct medium to another is often a challenge—one that many artists attempt. However, not all accomplish it with the seeming ease of Rachel Brumer. Working in varying combinations of textile, installation, sculpture, photography, and collage, Brumer diligently investigates a number of subjects. Foremost in her work is an almost pathological focus on remembering and honoring people, places, and moments through what she[…..]

Fan Mail: Tom Pazderka

TP Image 3

Tom Pazderka’s work has a visual weight and intensity—scarred and blackened reused wood, grids made of charred book jackets, charcoal- and wood-burning drawings of ancient, destroyed, and invented places—that is matched only by the artist’s descriptions of his subjects. Pazderka takes an interest in history as a flexible structure with multiple readings: “That which most [people] would rather leave alone I find the most interest[…..]

Fan Mail: Matt Hendon

Matt Hendon. Third Pilot, 2013; mixed media; 8 x 10 inches. Courtesy of the Artist

Matt Hendon’s ongoing body of work in mixed media, Everything That Can Expire, is about challenging himself: first, to reimagine what it means to work with images instead of creating drawings or illustrations; and second, to create compositions that complicate his own and his viewers’ visual aesthetic sense. In addition to being a visual artist, Hendon works as a designer, and there are interesting and[…..]

Fan Mail: Rachel Debuque

Rachel Debuque. Cacti-Smash (Performance and Installation), 2013; paint, wood moon cacti, gloves, plastic goggles, test tubes, knife, glass bowl, watch glasses plaster cast moon cacti, plaster cast cat sticks, cast plastic cat stick, aluminum, plastic roofing, extension cords, power strip, fake plants; 8’ x 10’ x 8’ feet. Courtesy of the artist.

Rachel Debuque works with myriad subjects and forms. In her work, installation, performance, video, and sculpture collide with themes of domesticity, the still life, and the eccentricities of both individual personalities and physical spaces. Through all of this, her oeuvre coheres around a central concern: the visual re-codification and conveyance of memory through spatial sensitivity. Debuque’s Cacti-Smash (2013) is an installation-based performance that features two[…..]

Fan Mail: Jeff Depner

Jeff Depner. Reconfigured Grid Painting No.18, 2012; acrylic on canvas; 50” x 43” inches. Courtesy of the Artist.

Jeff Depner’s commitment to one medium, in this case to painting, is rare in the current climate, in which artists work across increasingly varied platforms and often combine mediums. Depner’s paintings simultaneously explore paintings’ storied and experimental past and burgeoning future. Most of his richly layered acrylic works systematically investigate the possibilities of the medium by following a similar internal logic that in turn gives[…..]

Fan Mail: Cody Arnall

Cody Arnall. Makeup Case, Foosball Parts, Telephone Wiring, Lamp Post, Light Fixture, Glass Light Covering, Electrical Wiring, Paint, Sawdust, Wood Glue, 2010; makeup case, foosball parts, telephone wiring, lamp post, light fixture, glass light covering, electrical wiring, paint, sawdust, wood glue; 3’8” x 1’6” x 1’6” feet. Courtesy of the artist.

Cody Arnall uses his unique vision to approach the mundane and utilitarian objects that surround him. By seeing the potential in these objects, Arnall transforms latent possibilities into new combinations that simultaneously approach a mysterious beauty and a perceivable yet unnamed functionality. Much of Arnall’s reconfiguring has to do with bringing a distinct “energy, force, and movement” (his words) to the everyday objects in his[…..]

Fan Mail: Liliana Farber

Liliana Farber. Nighthawks, #16, 2008; photography, archival ink print; 30 x 20 cm. Courtesy the artist.

It’s hard not to get lost in the rich colors, abstract tensile lines, and intense shades of gray in Liliana Farber’s photographs and prints—and for that matter, in the endless rabbit hole of mouse clicks one of her web-based works elicits. Farber works in a series of potentially unrelated mediums, and in some cases, structures: video, ink on paper, photography, a website, and image manipulation[…..]