Posts Tagged ‘Fan Mail’

Fan Mail: Darren Jones

Darren Jones. Deeper Understanding, 2008; Broken computer, additional and rearranged keyboard keys; 11 x 17 x 11 in. Courtesy the artist.

Darren Jones works across a wide range of forms and subjects, often displaying an adroit sense of humor in his installations, sculptures, digital images, and text based artworks. However, Jones’s work is not only a series of well-pitched interventions and re-arrangements; there is a poetic and delicate seriousness that complicates much of what he makes. Deeper Understanding (2008) turns his old broken laptop, stuck in[.....]

Fan Mail: Sarah O’Donnell

Sarah O’Donnell. A Visible Night, 2013; Interior image of site specific installation at abandoned Moran energy plant, Burlington, VT, colored silks, rotating LED light, light board; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

In Sarah O’Donnell’s work, cinema, the diorama, and immersive installation come together to give shape to her fascination with and investigation of human memory. O’Donnell is specifically interested in the places and characters through which memories are made. She often re-creates memories through her own ever-evolving methods of mise-en-scène and editing. In this way, her works all seem to reside somewhere between explaining and further[.....]

Fan Mail: PUTPUT

Objective Ambition #1, 2012; sculpture; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

PUTPUT is the Swiss and Danish artist duo of Stefan Friedli and Ulrik Martin Larsen. Though they primarily work in photography, their medium seems secondary—it’s merely the most effective form for documenting their work. The duo re-imagines objects and captures eccentric still-life setups, photographs, and object re-imaginings that open up an entire world of potential visual and sculptural combinations. The objects they create range from[.....]

Fan Mail: Andy Ralph

Andy Ralph. Lawn Chairs, 2010; Aluminum pipe, aluminum hardware, and lawn chair webbing;
85 x 136 x 116 in. Courtesy of Charles Bergquist

Brooklyn-based artist Andy Ralph’s artistic practice could be summed up as a series of calculated—yet remarkably broad—risks. There is, however, one unifying identifiable approach in his work: Ralph engages with the imaginary potentials that reside in utilitarian objects. He transforms objects, or object-structures, into humorous, critical, and provocative configurations that provide a depth of both aesthetic-visual texture and conceptual rigor. Ralph’s projects range from Manifold[.....]

Fan Mail: Tara Sellios

Tara Sellios. Untitled No. 3 (from the series Lessons of Impermanence), 2009; digital C-prints; 40 x 60 in. Courtesy of the artist.

The still life is an artistic form that has captured the interest of Pieter Aertsen, Pieter Claesz, Diego Velázquez, Eugène Delacroix, and Giorgio Morandi, to name just a few. Boston-based artist Tara Sellios has also delved deeply into the construction of the still life and the ideas often associated with it—life, death, the question of permanence, and the intricate use of symbolism. What makes Sellios’s[.....]

Fan Mail: Alexander Rosenberg

Alexander Rosenberg. A Momentary Enlightenment, 2010. Oil painting on stretched canvas, surveillance camera, black and white security monitor, fur hat; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

In 1776 Benjamin Franklin was a celebrity in France. In a series of portraits made during that year, Franklin was depicted wearing a fur hat, the same chapeau that French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau was known for wearing. According to the French, this made Franklin an enlightened thinker, like Rousseau. In his painting A Momentary Enlightenment (2010), Philadelphia artist Alexander Rosenberg depicts himself in the same[.....]

Fan Mail: Andrew Fish

Andrew Fish. Bartender, 2013; oil on canvas; 30 x 40 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Boston-based painter Andrew Fish is working out solutions—proofs perhaps—to a complex problem we all deal with on some level, every day: what is the difference between an analog and a digital visual experience? Fish, interestingly, has chosen painting—arguably the most antiquated form of visual production—to seek answers to this query. His choice of medium confronts the proliferation of digital image making and publishing made possible[.....]