Posts Tagged ‘feminism’

Beverly Buchanan: Ruins and Rituals at the Brooklyn Museum

Beverly Buchanan. Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture), n.d.; black and white photograph with original paint marks, 8 ½ x 11 inches. ©Estate of Beverly Buchanan, Courtesy of Jane Bridges and the Brooklyn Museum.

A comprehensive and long overdue exhibition of Beverly Buchanan’s work kicks off A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum—a yearlong program of ten exhibitions celebrating the first decade of the museum’s Elizabeth Sackler Feminist Art Center. In a time when voices of misogyny and white supremacy are gaining renewed validation in national political discourse, exploring assumptions around feminism and what feminist art[…..]

From the Archives – Alien She at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

L.J. Roberts. We Couldn’t Get In. We Couldn’t Get Out., 2006–07; installation view, Alien She, 2014. Courtesy of Phocasso and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco.

Alien She’s assemblage of Riot Grrrl output continues to inspire collective feminist organizing.

The Guerrilla Girls and La Barbe at mfc-michèle didier

La Barbe. Au patriarcat, les hommes reconnaissants [To the patriarchy, the grateful men]; digital print; 8.3 x 11.7 in. Courtesy of La Barbe. Photo: Charles Duprat.

After thirty years of the Guerrilla Girls presenting statistics that repeatedly show the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in public collections, museums, and galleries around the world, one would think that these institutions would have been driven to promote changes en masse, if only out of shame. Yet, as the New York–based feminist group keeps evidencing, the archaic status quo in the art world has proven[…..]

Carmen Winant: Pictures of Women Working at Skibum MacArthur

Carmen Winant. Pictures of Women Working, 2016; installation view. Courtesy of Skibum MacArthur, Los Angeles. Photo: Brica Wilcox.

The question of work becomes complex when one asks who is doing it, and for whom. The precarious labor of domestic chores gone unfairly compensated, the frequently banal performance of activism and demonstration, sex work—these labors remain concerns in our current social and economic spheres, and reflect a problematic, historical trajectory that often fails to incorporate and value unseen, marginalized work and workers.[1] In Pictures[…..]

Renowned Feminist Art Historian Amelia Jones Believes that the Discipline of Art History Should be Restructured to Embrace New Narratives and Diverse Voices

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This week, from our friends at Huffington Post, we bring you an article by artist and writer Jacqueline Bishop exploring the career of art historian Amelia Jones, who has long questioned and worked to challenge existing disciminatory structures as they relate to race, gender, and identity. Bishop quotes Jones, saying “From very early on I found myself interrogating the structures of the discipline, by asking such questions as, ‘Where[…..]

Summer Session – Suzanne Lacy on the Feminist Program at Fresno State and CalArts

CalArts students at Klubnikin Packing Co., downtown Los Angeles, in Maps, 1973. Happening in Los Angeles, CA. Photo: Susan Mogul. Courtesy of Suzanne Lacy.

Back to School is the focus of this month’s Summer Session, and today we bring you an interview from our friends at East of Borneo between Moira Roth and Suzanne Lacy, illustrating the ways in which Lacy’s graduate experience shaped her as an artist. Here, Lacy describes how feminism as part of her formal education was inextricably linked to her nascent art practice, and how the[…..]

Summer Session – “Little Chance to Advance”: Why Women Artists in Academia Are Left Behind

Karolina Melnica. Celujacy (Excellent), n.d.; performance documentation.

Welcome to the first installment of our Summer Session topic “Back to School.” For this session we will be talking about art and the academy, exploring the unique opportunities, challenges, and problematics specific to academia. Today we bring you an article by Bean Gilsdorf reporting on the Katarzyna Kozyra Foundation’s study on the lack of women in positions of power within the Polish art academy. The foundation finds[…..]