Posts Tagged ‘film’

Summer Reading: Amie Siegel

Amie Siegel. Still from Provenance, 2013; HD video, color, sound; 40 minutes, 30 seconds. Images courtesy of the artist and Simon Preston Gallery, New York.

As the editors at Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts of our[.....]

Queering the Archive: When a Personal Act of Collecting Turns Political

Karol Radziszewski. Kisieland, 2012 (film still); High definition video; 30:00. Courtesy of the artist.

Today we bring you Queering the Archive: When a Personal Act of Collecting Turns Political, an article on queer art and activism in Eastern Europe recently featured on our sister site, Art Practical. Author Ela Bittencourt notes, “Kisiel’s slides…reverse the commonly accepted notion that there was no room for individual expression, least of all same-sex eroticism, in communist Eastern Europe. At the same time, their secretive circulation[.....]

Screening Readership

Tee Pee Video Space Troupe. A video totem showing self-portrait of the photographer, 1973; black and white. Photo Credit: Peter Angelo Simon.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Erica C. Gomez‘s essay on the “readership” and active interpretation of film. She notes, “Reading film is an action that extends outward, producing new lines of movement through publics and counterpublics.” This article was originally published on December 4, 2013. Ever since the Lumière brothers’ 1895 public film screening, rapid changes have marked the film exhibition[.....]

Yael Bartana at Pérez Art Museum Miami

Yael Bartana. Inferno, 2013 (video still); HD video with sound; 18 minutes. Courtesy of the Artist; Petzel, New York; Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam; and Sommer Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv.

To say that Yael Bartana’s latest film, Inferno, opens in epic fashion would be a bit of an understatement. Accompanied by a dramatic score, the initial shot begins with a flyover of an expansive forest, which suddenly opens up to the colossal cityscape of São Paulo. Dominating the frame, the city appears as a vast empire, an allusion that sets up the rest of the film. The[.....]

Kim Anno: Water City Berkeley at Kala Art Institute

Kim Anno. Water City Berkeley, 2013 (still); dual-projected video; 21:00. Courtesy of the artist.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, John Zarobell reviews Water City Berkeley at Kala Art Institute in Berkeley, California. Why celebrate when the world is going to hell? Kim Anno’s ambitious effort to envision the future[.....]

Tracey Moffatt: Spirit Landscapes at Tyler Rollins Fine Art / Spectrum Queer Media at New Parkway Theater

AS I LAY BACK ON MY ANCESTRAL LAND NO. 2, TRACEY MOFFATT, 2013
DIGITAL PRINT
49 X 72 IN. (125 X 184 CM), EDITION OF 8

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. This week, we have two Shotgun Reviews for our readers! In the first, Bansie Vasvani reviews Tracey Moffatt’s Spirit Landscapes at Tyler Rollins Fine Art in New York City. In the second, Felicia Hayes[.....]

From the Archives: You Killed Me First: The Cinema of Transgression at Kunst-Werke

After the Smithsonian’s G. Wayne Clough decided to remove David Wojnarowicz’s film A Fire in My Belly from the exhibition Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture, Wojnarowicz became a household name and a cultural touchstone, to the point where Vanity Fair can now glibly claim, “Right-wing America will be begging for David Wojnarowicz…” and expect its readers to get the joke. In September, Clough[.....]