Posts Tagged ‘film’

Courtyards and Shipwrecks

L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast A weekly column by Catherine Wagley Agnes Varda, the 82-year-old Parisian filmmaker who won the Golden Lion, was married to Jacques Demy, and dressed as a Potato for the 2003 Venice Biennale, has lived on a courtyard off Rue Daguerre for over half a century. The way she speaks of it in her filmed autobiography, The Beaches of[.....]

Francis Alÿs: A Story of Deception

Francis Alÿs in collaboration with Olivier Debroise and Rafael Ortega. A Story of Deception, Patagonia, 2006 still from 16mm film (4:20). Courtesy of Francis Alÿs and Galerie Peter Kilchmann, Zurich © Francis Alÿs. A Story of Deception is the title of Francis Alÿs‘ current retrospective on view at the Tate Modern. The title of the exhibition, which spans the artist’s two-decade long career is borrowed[.....]

Rachel Khedoori

Artist Rachel Khedoori explores encounters with space and their psychological implications.  According to the Venice Biennale’s Making Worlds catalog, Khedoori’s art practice ‘invites viewers to see hidden or forgotten spaces’ – spaces that are ‘generated by the limits of memory’.  In Cave Model, presented at that show, Khedoori referenced Plato’s Cave Myth and cited it as a source of inspiration.  Yet her art practice deviates[.....]

Stranger Friends

L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast A weekly column by Catherine Wagley At the start of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Truman Capote’s charming novella about a troubled socialite looking for “what’s hers” and attracted to everything that’s not, the unnamed narrator receives a message from a bartender named Joe Bell. He meets Bell, an old friend, and the two clandestinely talk about Holly, the socialite[.....]

Robert Lendrum: I’ve Been Shot

In the 1988 action film, Die Hard, John McClane (played by Bruce Willis) hustles around a Los Angeles skyscraper—sweat-soaked and shirtless—in an effort to save his wife and other hostages from a ruthless terrorist group. At various points throughout the film, McClane (an NYPD officer) survives a partial jump from an exploding building and smashes through a plate glass window. Basically, he is injured to[.....]

Danielle Nelson Mourning: Homecoming

I’m a sucker for a storyline involving a protagonist’s search for identity across generations and distant lands. More often than not this fascination is satisfied by reading a novel or watching a film, maybe listening to a three-verse country song. It’s not often that such a sprawling narrative emerges from within a work of art, but such is the case with the series of photographs[.....]

Johan Grimonprez

Despite the plethora of images and information that inundates contemporary life, we can rarely be certain of the reliability or the persuasive spin defining what we encounter.  Artist Johan Grimonprez questions the reality presented by news media and popular culture and sees that fear has become a global commodity. In an effort to make sense of the chaos and to offer his own critical analysis,[.....]