Posts Tagged ‘From the Archives’

From the Archives – Whose Map Is It? New Mapping by Artists

BouchraKhalili

Today from our archives we bring you Kelly Nosari’s assessment of Whose Map Is It? at the Institute of International Visual Arts in London. Considering the wars currently being waged over land in Palestine, the Ukraine, Syria, and South Sudan (to name just a few), it is interesting to note how artists approach the representation of territory. This article was originally published on July 8,[.....]

From the Archives – Enrique Metinides: Chronicling Catastrophe

Mexico City, September 19, 1985 © Enrique Metindies, Courtesy 212berlin

Today from the DS archives, we bring you Allegra Kirkland’s review of Chronicling Catastrophe. Originally published on February 26, 2013, this article is a consideration of Enrique Metinides‘ fifty-year-long career in chronicling disasters that are, in Kirkland’s words, “anonymous crime [scenes] and hauntingly specific [tragedies].” Unfortunately, these images, and ones like them, are ever-relevant in our violent, modern world. The journalistic expression “If it bleeds, it leads” is particularly[.....]

From the Archives – Raymond Pettibon: Hard in the Paint at David Zwirner

Raymond Pettibon. No Title (Where's the green...) 2010; 30 x 22 1/8 in.

Today we bring you a treat from our archives, Michael Tomeo’s review of Raymond Pettibon’s 2010 show at David Zwirner in New York. The reprinting of this review is occasioned by Pettibon’s upcoming conversation with Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon at Strand Book Store on June 25, 2014, in which they’ll chat about his new book Raymond Pettibon: To Wit. This article was originally published on November 17,[.....]

From the Archives – Post-Fordlândia: A Critical Look at a Failed Development

Factory

Today we bring you a look back at the videos and photographs of Tom Flanagan and Megs Morley, whose project Post-Fordlândia explored the famous village created by Henry Ford in 1928. Author Tori Bush draws parallels between this forsaken 20th-century urban planning project in the Amazon and its counterpart in present-day New Orleans. This article was originally published on September 6, 2012. Post-Fordlândia, the new exhibit[.....]

From the Archives – Rogue Wave at L.A. Louver

Matthew Brandt. Rainbow Lake WY 1, 2013, C-print soaked in Rainbow Lake water, 72 x 105 in. Courtesy of L.A. Louver

From San Francisco to Los Angeles, California suffered an unseasonably early heat wave this week. With temperatures in Los Angeles breaking 100 degrees, everyone is dreaming of a day at the beach. Today we bring you Catlin Moore‘s review of L.A. Louver‘s annual summer show; though it was originally published on August 15, 2013, the feeling of the show seems apropos for right now. It’s July[.....]

From the Archives – Postscript: Writing After Conceptual Art

Today we bring you an article from our archives, a review of Postscript: Writing After Conceptual Art. Author Caitlin Sutherland notes that the show “addresses the intersection of conceptual art and writing from a unique perspective. The use of the term after in the title does not necessarily reference a chronological narrative in which conceptual writing emerged from post-conceptual art. Instead, it may signify the relationship between the two[.....]

From the Archives: You Killed Me First: The Cinema of Transgression at Kunst-Werke

After the Smithsonian’s G. Wayne Clough decided to remove David Wojnarowicz’s film A Fire in My Belly from the exhibition Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture, Wojnarowicz became a household name and a cultural touchstone, to the point where Vanity Fair can now glibly claim, “Right-wing America will be begging for David Wojnarowicz…” and expect its readers to get the joke. In September, Clough[.....]