Posts Tagged ‘Gallery Wendi Norris’

Science in Surrealism at Gallery Wendi Norris

Kurt Seligmann. Moonscape, 1959; oil on canvas; 48 x 36 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Sienna Freeman reviews Science in Surrealism at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco.  Gallery Wendi Norris’ current exhibition, Science in Surrealism, showcases 20 historic works from[…..]

Tomokazu Matsuyama: Come With Me at Gallery Wendi Norris

Tomokazu Matsuyama. Warm Water, 2015; acrylic and mixed media on canvas; 67 x 104 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Forrest McGarvey reviews Tomokazu Matsuyama’s Come with Me at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco. In Come With Me, Japanese American artist Tomokazu[…..]

The Return to Reason at Gallery Wendi Norris

Stephen Gill. Talking to Ants, 2009–12; pigment archival paper print, image 40 x 40 in., paper 44 x 44 in., edition of 5 plus 2 AP. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of the current group show at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco. Author Danica Willard Sachs writes: “In a moment when the commonplace assumption is that photographs are digitally manipulated, the exhibition shines in its success at reminding viewers that wonder can still be found in the analog realm of the darkroom, or[…..]

The Right Stuff: Amir H. Fallah at Gallery Wendi Norris

In our predominantly consumerist society, it is increasingly difficult to disconnect ourselves from our belongings. Barbara Kruger summarized the contemporary Cartesian dualism when she created her 1987 piece, “I Shop Therefore I am.” The more we define ourselves through our endlessly multiplying clutter, the harder it is to relate to others who don’t share our specific collection of objects onto which we project meaning and[…..]