Posts Tagged ‘Genevieve Quick’

Locating Technology: Raiders and Empires

Stephanie Syjuco. RAIDERS: International Booty, Bountiful Harvest (Selections from the Collection of the A____ A__ M_____) (installation view), 2011; digital archival photo prints mounted onto laser-cut wood, hardware, crates; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Catharine Clark, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s most recent “Locating Technology” column, a consideration of artist Stephanie Syjuco’s process and practice: “[Syjuco] prompts viewers to consider more broadly the legality and ethics of museums’ collections, and suggests that museums are institutions of cultural appropriation.” This article was originally published on October 27, 2015. Much of the history of museum collections is related to[…..]

Raiders and Empires

Stephanie Syjuco. Empire/Other: Morphset E, 2013 (video still); 3D animated video. Courtesy of the Artist and FLACC Workplace for Visual Artists, Belgium.

In these projects Syjuco harnesses technologies of distribution and reproduction—the web, photography, and 3D scanning and printing—to create objects that reveal the tangled history of colonization and cultural hybridization.

Mechanized Bodies: Anxiety and Healing in a Global Economy

Vicky Funari and Sergio De La Torre. Maquilapolis (City of Factories) (still by David Maung), 2006; film; 68:00. Courtesy of the Artists.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an essay on art, manufacturing, and workers’ bodies. Author Genevieve Quick explains, “Whether in the U.S., Mexico, or India, workers endure the same cycle: becoming part of a larger network of production that can be disassembled and relocated, rendering them redundant. Assembly-line production has taken its toll on workers’ bodies since the beginning of industrialization, and its absence[…..]

Beta Space: Diana Thater at San Jose Museum of Art

Diana Thater. Science, Fiction, 2015; two video projectors, media player, and lights; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist; San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose; and David Zwirner, London/New York.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Diana Thater’s current solo exhibition at the San Jose Museum of Art. Author Genevieve Quick notes that this exhibition is remarkably similar to ones the artist has already presented: “I am unconvinced that Thater’s minor changes constitute new works or the experimentation that the series seeks to support.” This article was originally published on April 28,[…..]

Jean Conner: Collages at Gallery Paule Anglim

Jean Conner. Untitled (Mother Daughter), 1980; paper collage; 13½ x 9¾ in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Paule Anglim.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Jean Conner’s collages at Gallery Paule Anglim in San Francisco. Catch this show if you can! Author Genevieve Quick calls the artist’s work “strongly provocative” and notes, “[Conner’s] confidence and skill in selection, placement, and juxtaposition… create surprising amounts of visual play, leading to strong formal compositions and intriguing ideas.” This article[…..]

#Hashtags – Locating Techonology: Therapeutic Bodies

Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett, featuring Daisy Press. Whispering Pines 10, 2012; performance at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Courtesy of the Artist and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s consideration of performances by Mika Rottenberg and Shana Moulton. The author notes: “As early media artists and feminists have done, Rottenberg and Moulton construct imaginative narratives that probe the unsettling relationship between the body, screens, technology, and contemporary life.” This article was originally published on October 15, 2014. Mika Rottenberg’s and Shana Moulton’s absurdist[…..]

Jessamyn Lovell: Dear Erin Hart at SF Camerawork

Jessamyn Lovell. Following 6 (Fence), 2014; digital print on vinyl; 96 x 133 in. Courtesy of the Artist and SF Camerawork, San Francisco.

From our sister publication Art Practical, today we bring you a review of artist Jessamyn Lovell’s surveillance photography—artwork that has an incredible backstory. Author Genevieve Quick notes, “By leaving the project open-ended, Lovell smartly expands the work beyond revenge and allows viewers to consider its complexities through their own moral codes.” This article was originally published on September 25, 2014. In Jessamyn Lovell’s exhibition Dear Erin Hart,[…..]