Posts Tagged ‘German Art’

New Objectivity: Modern German Art in the Weimar Republic, 1919–33, at LACMA

August Sander. Painter’s Wife [Helene Abelen], 1926; gelatin silver print; 10 3/16 x 7 3/8 in. Courtesy of LACMA.

Following World War I and the humiliating terms of the Treaty of Versailles, the Weimar Constitution was ratified, establishing Germany’s first democracy. It ushered in a thriving cultural climate: Expressionism came to an end, the Dadaists engaged in anti-art activities, the Bauhaus school was established, and in particular, Neue Sachlichkeit, or “New Objectivity,” emerged. The movement was an alternative realism, endemic to post–WWI Germany, and[…..]

The Hat, That Never Existed: Christoph Roßner at Romer Young

The paintings of Dresden-based Christoph Roßner have the power of a waking dream.  As opposed to our regular, logically- and visually-tangled dreams, the visions we have right before we fall asleep – or even in the middle of the day – tend to focus on single objects:  things recognizable but out of reach, comforting but not quite tangible.  Slow and atmospheric, they demand time and[…..]