Posts Tagged ‘Hammer Museum’

UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015 at the Hammer Museum

Frances Stark. Bobby Jesus’s Alma Mater b/w Reading the Book of David	and/or Paying Attention Is Free, 2013; multichannel projection with sound, inkjet 	mural, and takeaway offset posters; 7:20 min. Installation view, Carnegie International, 2013. Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Conley.

In a mid-career survey as large as UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991–2015, on view at the Hammer Museum, I’m usually tempted to rush over a couple of galleries and maybe even skip a video here or there. From the get-go, Stark’s exhibition, featuring 125 drawings, collages, paintings, and video installations, had me enthralled with My Best Thing (2011), a 100-minute-long episodic animation based on the artist’s[…..]

Hammer Projects: Mary Reid Kelley at Hammer Museum

Mary Reid Kelley with Patrick Kelley. Priapus Agonistes, 2013 (video still). Single-channel HD video, black and white, sound; 15:09 min. Courtesy of the Artists; Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects; Fredericks & Freiser Gallery, New York; and Pilar Corrias, London.

Now on view at Hammer Museum, Mary Reid Kelley’s videos are a collision of drawing, performance, and wordplay that clatter against Greek mythology to produce a visually spare, lexically rich cycle. Working with videographer Patrick Kelley, the artist has produced three black-and-white videos that follow the story of the half-woman, half-bull Minotaur, her lust-crazed mother Pasiphae, and her helpless sister Ariadne through boldly drawn landscapes.[…..]

The Unmooring of Jibade-Khalil Huffman

Jibade-Khalil Huffman. Untitled (Cake), 2015. Archival inkjet print, 8 x 10 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Anna Martine Whitehead’s consideration of the work of artist Jibade-Khalil Huffman. The author notes, “For Huffman, poetry is a means to shape-shift and mistranslate, reforming meaning by first dissolving it.” This article was originally published on April 16, 2015.  In her pivotal essay “Poetry Is Not a Luxury,” Audre Lorde writes of the “places of possibility[…..]

#Hashtags: Conceptualizing Difference

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989. 
Installation view at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. February 8-May 24, 2015. Photography by Brian Forrest.

#institutions #race #conceptualism #access #appropriation A recent performance at Brown University by conceptual poet Kenneth Goldsmith has resurrected what had seemed to be a long-ago-settled debate. Goldsmith, whose poetic practice is based on appropriation, presented an adaptation of the autopsy report of Ferguson, Missouri, police shooting victim Michael Brown as a poetic reading during the Interrupt 3 arts festival in mid-March. The subsequent commentary has largely taken Goldsmith to task for what many perceive to have[…..]

Hammer Projects: N. Dash at The Hammer Museum

N. Dash. Untitled, 2014; adobe, oil, pigment, string, acrylic, linen, jute, and wood support. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: The Hammer Museum.

N. Dash’s solo exhibit at the Hammer Museum begins with a series of Duratrans transparencies displaying magnified wreaths of frayed fabric in architectural light boxes. Her work, which faces the open and airy courtyard of the Los Angeles museum, was presented in conjunction with the Mandala of Compassion for two weeks, a live exhibit in which Tibetan Buddhist monks constructed a sacred mandala using colored sands[…..]

The Dark Side of Mickey Mouse: Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum

Llyn Foulkes. Pop, 1985-90; mixed media with soundtrack; 84 x 123 x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist's website.

Llyn Foulkes ranks among that rare cadre of artists for whom fame is an optional extra. Over the course of his fifty-year career, the Los Angeles–based multimedia artist and musician has experienced periods of success—for his monumental Pop-influenced paintings of rocks and, decades later, for his zany, large-scale narrative tableaux. But much of his work has been met with silence from critics and buyers, allowing[…..]

Llyn Foulkes at the Hammer Museum

For both Walt Disney and Llyn Foulkes, it all started with a mouse. Mickey, to be precise, accompanied both men throughout their respective careers—Disney in a manner of lucrative iconography, and Foulkes in a manner of psychological distress. To most, the cartoon rodent was the paragon of jubilant youth, but through Foulkes’ lens, Mickey was a sanitized, furtive representative of the rats infesting the politics,[…..]