Posts Tagged ‘#hashtags’

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Rebel Rebel

Leee Black Childers. David Bowie as Ziggy Stardust, Philadelphia, 1973. Digital C-print.

This July we’re talking about celebrity, and today we bring you an article from our #Hashtags column that explores the intersection of art, social issues, and global politics. In this essay, author Anuradha Vikram talks about how the queerness of countercultural artists becomes appropriated as they achieve stardom, leaving behind the precariousness that first defined them while it continues to define their colleagues. This article was originally published[…..]

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Culture, Class and the New Economy

Michal Wisniowski. "Guard Secrets" Google Bus, 2014. Digital image. Submission to Mission Local's "Bedazzle a Tech Bus" Call for Entries.

The first theme in our Summer Session series is labor, and today we’re revisiting Anuradha Vikram’s essay on the so-called creative economy and its effects: “The mythology of the creative economy explains much of why San Franciscans who have pioneered this approach to work are under-invested in the arts despite some apparent affinities. Why support artists with your hard-earned income when you are fully convinced you[…..]

Summer Session – #Hashtags: The Business End of Art

Ray Beldner. Moneybags, 2008. Sewn US Currency. Courtesy Charlie James Gallery.

June’s theme is labor, and today we bring you an installment of Anuradha Vikram’s #Hashtags, a series that explores the intersection of art, social issues, and global politics. In today’s so-called creative economy, Vikram notes, “The most successful artist will be the one who knows how to make capital work for her, rather than working for capital.” This article was originally published on March 23, 2015.   #artmarket[…..]

#Hashtags: Convergences and Displacements

Community assists with evacuation of Townhouse library and archives, April 9, 2016. Photo courtesy Townhouse Gallery.

#Townhouse #Cairo #gentrification #urban #culture #displacement This past week has left the venerable nonprofit Townhouse Gallery shaken. Though the attempted demolition of its building at 10 Nabrawy Street in Cairo has been halted, the gallery is faced with months of work ahead to secure its future. Operating since 1998, Townhouse is known for drawing international artists and thinkers to Egypt, and nurturing an emerging network of[…..]

Hashtags: Crossing the Lines

Breezeway, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, 2016, with installation view: Shinique Smith, 
Forgiving Strands, 
2015 – 2016. Image courtesy the artist and  Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joshua Targownik / targophoto.com

#capitalism #markets #institutions #gentrification #innovation Two recent unconventional gallery openings on the West Coast have upended expectations about how the commercial and nonprofit sectors of the art world correspond to and interact with one another. Hauser Wirth & Schimmel’s seven-building complex in Los Angeles’ downtown arts district is a commercial gallery with institutional ambitions, promising thematic exhibitions, high-profile loans, publishing, and scholarship. Minnesota Street Project,[…..]

Hashtags: The Impossible Dream

Clark Richert, view of Drop City, “the Complex,” in El Morro, outside Trinidad, Colorado, circa 1966. Photo: courtesy Drop City Photo Archives

#utopia #nostalgia #technology #street art #counterculture Technology and utopia are united in a certain subset of counterculture in Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia at the Walker Art Center. The show illustrates the ideals and limitations of the utopian imaginings by artists of the 1960s and early 1970s with early computer graphics imaging, speculative architecture proposals, political posters, and installation art. In contrast to ideal societies,[…..]

#Hashtags: In Defense of the Middle-Class Artist

Jeremy Deller. English Magic, 2013. 55th Venice Biennale.

#art #class #wealth #access #innovation #middleclass Writing for Artnet in January, Ben Davis’s “Do You Have to Be Rich to Make It as an Artist?” raised an important question about the relationship between privilege and access to a life in the arts. Examining the upbringings of a number of artists currently or recently on view at museums in New York, Davis drew the conclusion that if[…..]