Posts Tagged ‘#hashtags’

#Hashtags: Conceptualizing Difference

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989. 
Installation view at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. February 8-May 24, 2015. Photography by Brian Forrest.

#institutions #race #conceptualism #access #appropriation A recent performance at Brown University by conceptual poet Kenneth Goldsmith has resurrected what had seemed to be a long-ago-settled debate. Goldsmith, whose poetic practice is based on appropriation, presented an adaptation of the autopsy report of Ferguson, Missouri, police shooting victim Michael Brown as a poetic reading during the Interrupt 3 arts festival in mid-March. The subsequent commentary has largely taken Goldsmith to task for what many perceive to have[…..]

#Hashtags: The Business End of Art

Steve Lambert. Capitalism Works For Me! True/False, 2011.
9 ft x 20 ft x 7 ft.
Aluminum and electrical.

#artmarket #creativeeconomy #collectors #entrepreneur #philanthropy #support As in nearly every field of commerce, it seems that the tension between old and new models of the business of art is coming to a head. Traditional galleries see that their established methods of selling selectively and covertly to buyers of high social standing are under threat. Museums, which once were beneficiaries of philanthropic largesse from those same[…..]

#Hashtags: Political Abstraction – The Revolution is Us

sturtevant_study_for_muybridge_plate_97_woman_walking_196641

In a 2012 essay for e-flux, After OWS: Social Practice Art, Abstraction, and the Limits of the Social, Gregory Sholette asks whether there can be a role for abstraction within the flourishing new discipline of socially engaged post-conceptual art practice. This remains a valid question given that most activist art is still understood to be representational, based on precedents from the Civil Rights era such as[…..]

Best of 2014 – #Hashtags: Mimics and Minstrels

Sturtevant. Warhol Black Marilyn. 2004. Synthetic polymer silkscreen and acrylic on canvas. 15 ¾ x 13 ¾ in. (40 x 35 cm). Ringier Collection, courtesy Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London.  © Sturtevant.

Continuing our Best of 2014 series, regular contributor Tori Bush writes, “Anuradha Vikram’s essay reflects on how American institutions, both in the art world and the real world, have myopic—if not completely blind—views on the state of bias and racism today. If institutions of knowledge and culture like the Whitney Biennial cannot be more equitable in their curatorial choices, what example can be set for other American institutions[…..]

Best of 2014 – #Hashtags: Sweet and Low

Kara Walker. A Subtlety, 2014. Site-specific installation at Domino Sugar Factory, Brooklyn, NY. Commissioned by Creative Time. Photo by Rajath Vikram.

Here at Daily Serving we count down the days to the New Year by presenting you with our best writing from the outgoing year. Our first selection, from our 2014 #Hashtags column, comes from Lia Wilson: “Anuradha Vikram’s investigation of Kara Walker’s The Marvelous Sugar Baby is an incredibly deft navigation of the entanglement of race, gender, class, labor, capitol, and representation operating within the work[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: The Squeezing of the Middle Class Gallery

Tracey Snelling. "Mystery Hour," Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco, CA, December 19, 2013 - February 1, 2014. Photo credit: John Janca. Courtesy of the artist and Rena Bransten Gallery.

Today from our archives, we bring you an essay that’s ripe for reconsideration. Though San Francisco—like many other cities—has seen the closing of several mid-level galleries in the last few years, recent events have been more hopeful. There are at least two new art spaces in the city, and this weekend more than 3,500 artists and patrons successfully turned their cooperative efforts toward funding The Lab during a live 24-hour[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Divide//Conquer: Artists Confront the Gentrification of Urban Space

Mail Order Brides/M.O.B. (Jenifer Wofford, Reanne Estrada, Eliza Barrios). Manananggoogle, 2013. Multimedia installation including website and photographs. Commissioned by the San Jose Museum of Art with support from The James Irvine Foundation and MetLife Foundation.

Today from the archives we bring you a look back at Anuradha Vikram’s assessment of gentrification, power, and artistic protest. She notes, “The great tragedy of gentrification—which its proponents appear not to recognize—is that groups that are displaced can never be reunited in another, more affordable location.” This article was originally published on October 21, 2013. #gentrification #displacement #race #class #technology #industry #neo-colonialism To understand[…..]