Posts Tagged ‘#hashtags’

#Hashtags – Toward the Black Museum

Hammer Projects: Simone Leigh, September 17, 2016–January 8, 2017. Installation view, courtesy of Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.

#museums #race #representation #institutional critique The recent controversy over Kelley Walker’s exhibition Direct Drive at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, and the departure of that exhibition’s curator, Jeffrey Uslip, was another reminder that museums are not built and programmed for all audiences alike. As this column has taken up questions of race in the museum on numerous occasions (and class in the museum, and[…..]

#Hashtags: Water Water Everywhere

Teresa Margolles. La Sombra (The Shade), 2016; concrete veneer on wood. Artwork commissioned by City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) for CURRENT:LA Water. Photo by Panic Studio LA.

#environment #conservation #access #resources #water #public art #civic art #biennials Los Angeles is a metropolis built on a delusion: that engineering can overcome a basic lack of sufficient resources to meet the popular need. Five years into a severe drought, one would think conservation would be on everyone’s mind, but the clean cars and green lawns all around town suggest otherwise. To increase discussion of[…..]

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Education on Contingency

Christian Nagler. Yoga for Adjuncts, 2014. Workshop at  Valuing Labor in the Arts: A Practicum. Photo by Joanna Fuller. Courtesy of Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley.

For this month’s Summer Session we’re going Back to School, and today we bring you Anuradha Vikram’s #Hashtags column addressing adjunct labor. Higher education in the United States has become increasingly dependent upon this contingent and precarious workforce, and Vikram argues that its inherent instability is particularly jarring given the Marxian configuration of labor that underpins much of contemporary art rhetoric. This article was originally published on May 5,[…..]

Summer Session – #Hashtags: The Trouble with the Mission School

Alicia McCarthy. Untitled, 1996. Oil and latex on panel. 84 x 84 inches. Collection of Jeff Morris, Oakland. Photo by Johnna Arnold/SFAI.

Today we’re thinking about what “school” means as a way of codifying an art movement—that is, the politics, aesthetics, and ethos that are implied by attributing work to a particular school. In that vein, we present Anuradha Vikram’s review of SFAI’s 2013 exhibition Energy That Is All Around—Mission School, wherein Vikram analyzes the problematics of the Mission School attribution. This article was originally published on November 18,[…..]

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Rebel Rebel

Leee Black Childers. David Bowie as Ziggy Stardust, Philadelphia, 1973. Digital C-print.

This July we’re talking about celebrity, and today we bring you an article from our #Hashtags column that explores the intersection of art, social issues, and global politics. In this essay, author Anuradha Vikram talks about how the queerness of countercultural artists becomes appropriated as they achieve stardom, leaving behind the precariousness that first defined them while it continues to define their colleagues. This article was originally published[…..]

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Culture, Class and the New Economy

Michal Wisniowski. "Guard Secrets" Google Bus, 2014. Digital image. Submission to Mission Local's "Bedazzle a Tech Bus" Call for Entries.

The first theme in our Summer Session series is labor, and today we’re revisiting Anuradha Vikram’s essay on the so-called creative economy and its effects: “The mythology of the creative economy explains much of why San Franciscans who have pioneered this approach to work are under-invested in the arts despite some apparent affinities. Why support artists with your hard-earned income when you are fully convinced you[…..]

Summer Session – #Hashtags: The Business End of Art

Ray Beldner. Moneybags, 2008. Sewn US Currency. Courtesy Charlie James Gallery.

June’s theme is labor, and today we bring you an installment of Anuradha Vikram’s #Hashtags, a series that explores the intersection of art, social issues, and global politics. In today’s so-called creative economy, Vikram notes, “The most successful artist will be the one who knows how to make capital work for her, rather than working for capital.” This article was originally published on March 23, 2015.   #artmarket[…..]