Posts Tagged ‘identity’

The Disappeared at Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography

Zoë Heyn-Jones. Atitlán 1 (Feliz Viaje), 2014; ink-jet print on celluloid; 36 x 150 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography.

In The Disappeared, artists Tatiana Grigorenko and Zoë Heyn-Jones rewrite history through still and moving images. In the current exhibition at Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography, Grigorenko and Heyn-Jones negotiate their relationships with their ancestors and origins through altered photographs and Super 8 film. With disarming honesty, they interrogate the ways in which their private memories and personal realities overlap and diverge. This fissure between[…..]

The Self-Portraits of Samuel Fosso

The artist as Angela Davis from African Spirits, 2008
© Samuel Fosso. Courtesy The Walther Collection and Jean Marc Patras / Galerie

From our friends at Guernica, today we bring you a feature on the self-portraits of artist Samuel Fosso. Author Emmanuel Iduma notes, “The self-portraits are intimate for what they allow to be imagined… [T]hese representations of our favorite black heroes ask viewers to think about the use of public images, and how they become objects of worship, and of control.” This article was originally published on November 17,[…..]

Ayana V. Jackson: Archival Impulse at 33 Orchard

Ayana V. Jackson. Prototype/ Phenotype, 2013; archival pigment print; edition of 6 and 3 artist proofs; 39.4 x 45.5 in.

Ayana V. Jackson’s exhibition An Archival Impulse claims to take inspiration from Hal Foster’s idea that, through confronting the archive, new systems of knowledge can be created. Jackson’s artistic interrogation targets representations of non-European bodies during the 19th and 20th centuries, a period of significant colonial expansion in Africa and the Americas. This history of representation comprises a vast field of imagery and thousands of[…..]

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Mary and Leigh Block Museum

Wangechi Mutu. Suspended Playtime, 2008/2013; Packing blankets, twine, garbage bags, and gold string; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects.

This year has been unusually promising for the visibility of work by black female artists, even while that prominence has further highlighted racially problematic attitudes within the art world. The last ten months have marked the first in which an African American woman—Carrie Mae Weems—was given a retrospective at the Guggenheim, though her triumphant entry into that pantheon led to rebukes that the museum cut the original[…..]

#Hashtags: Black Futurism: The Creative Destruction and Reconstruction of Race in Contemporary Art

nuri Kahiu. Pumzi, film still, 2009. Courtesy Focus Features Africa First Short Film Program.

#blackness #afrofuturism #identity #agency #mobility Today we’re partnering with our friends at ART21 Magazine to bring you Nettrice Gaskins‘ excellent consideration of “Black futurism as a form of creative expression [that] pushes against the conventional limits of black subjectivity.” This article was originally published on June 24, 2014, in the “Future” issue of ART21 Magazine. For the online research project Liquid Blackness, Alessandra Raengo reflects on[…..]

Visual Markers: Interview with Dushko Petrovich

Dushko Petrovich. El Oso Carnal (in progress), 2012-present; acrylic on paper, 108 x 90 in.

I first met Dushko Petrovich in 2013 at the “Painting Expanded” symposium at the California College of the Arts. In his brief presentation and in the panel discussion that followed, it was clear that Petrovich is a thoughtful artist not afraid to question his own and others’ artistic practices. This quality is also evident in the publications he co-produces with Roger White, the art journal Paper[…..]

Locating Technology: Against Recognition

Zach Blas. Facial Weaponization Suite Communiqué: Fag Face, 2012 (video still); HD video; 08:10. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Zach Blas.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an essay by Emily K. Holmes, who analyzes the work of artist Zach Blas: “Blas creates space for facial-recognition technology to be not only strange, but dangerous and deserving of our critical questioning.” This article was originally published on April 16, 2014. Biometric technologies aim to “authenticate” and “verify” individuals by digitally scanning physical traits on[…..]