Posts Tagged ‘identity’

Fan Mail: Sarah Beth Woods

Sarah Beth Woods. A Big Diamond, 2016; hair weave, foam, door-knocker earrings; 67 x 7 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

True to its name, the BRAID/WORK series by Sarah Beth Woods operates within layers of social and material meaning, revealing a deconstructionist character even as it replicates the physical act of weaving. In the creation of these pieces, Woods pulls apart the concepts that make them legible. BRAID/WORK includes a 2016 performance and collaboration between Woods and the Malian-American professional hair braider, teacher, and entrepreneur[…..]

Question Bridge: Black Males in America

Question Bridge: Black Males in America (Aperture/Campaign for Black Male Achievement, 2015)

Today we bring you an excerpt from Art Practical’s Printed Matters column. Roula Seikaly reviews Question Bridge: Black Males in America, the published companion to a project, platform, and installation that regards identity and representation. Seikaly notes, “Asking a question […] can be difficult; it can imply lack of knowledge and experience, rendering the asker vulnerable. No one wants to be caught out, least of all when the questions address identity, community, and most urgently,[…..]

Tony Hope: TH+ at ASHES/ASHES

Tony Hope. Untitled (Hugh), 2015; installation view. Courtesy of the artist and ASHES/ASHES.

Obsessively attuned to the use of space, Tony Hope stages deceptively spare sculptural environments within the gallery of ASHES/ASHES in his first Los Angeles solo exhibition, TH+. The two installations, which are suggestive of one another in their polarity, speak to the larger context of the show as it pertains to the value of manufactured identity. Hope displays a deep understanding of the transience found within subcultural materials that do[…..]

Tseng Kwong Chi at Grey Art Gallery

Tseng Kwong Chi. New York, New York (World Trade Center), 1979, from the East Meets West series; Gelatin silver print, printed 2014; 36 x 36 in. Courtesy of Muna Tseng Dance Projects, Inc., New York

Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera is the first major retrospective on the artist, co-organized by the Chrysler Gallery and NYU’s Grey Art Gallery. Bringing Tseng’s body of work to the fore is an important and overdue project; his career was regularly eclipsed by his friends, whose trajectories characterized the 1980s New York City art market boom, most notably Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.[…..]

Jillian Mayer: Touchers at Aspect/Ratio

Jillian Mayer. 34.11° N, -118.26° W at 53’ inches, 2015; 46.2 x 26 in. Photograph printed on fabric. Courtesy of the Artist, Aspect/Ratio Chicago, and David Castillo, Miami.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Nicole Lane reviews Jillian Mayer: Touchers at Aspect/Ratio in Chicago. Jillian Mayer’s first solo exhibition in Chicago, Touchers, features two photographic works and a video installation[…..]

The Disappeared at Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography

Zoë Heyn-Jones. Atitlán 1 (Feliz Viaje), 2014; ink-jet print on celluloid; 36 x 150 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography.

In The Disappeared, artists Tatiana Grigorenko and Zoë Heyn-Jones rewrite history through still and moving images. In the current exhibition at Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography, Grigorenko and Heyn-Jones negotiate their relationships with their ancestors and origins through altered photographs and Super 8 film. With disarming honesty, they interrogate the ways in which their private memories and personal realities overlap and diverge. This fissure between[…..]

The Self-Portraits of Samuel Fosso

The artist as Angela Davis from African Spirits, 2008
© Samuel Fosso. Courtesy The Walther Collection and Jean Marc Patras / Galerie

From our friends at Guernica, today we bring you a feature on the self-portraits of artist Samuel Fosso. Author Emmanuel Iduma notes, “The self-portraits are intimate for what they allow to be imagined… [T]hese representations of our favorite black heroes ask viewers to think about the use of public images, and how they become objects of worship, and of control.” This article was originally published on November 17,[…..]