Posts Tagged ‘Installation’

Isabel Nolan: The Weakened Eye of Day at the Irish Museum of Modern Art

Isabel Nolan. The weakened eye of day, 2014; installation view, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin. Courtesy of the CCA Wattis Institute. Photo: © Denis Mortell

Boldly and optimistically, a viewer might enter Isabel Nolan’s exhibition The Weakened Eye of Day with bright, wondering eyes. In Room 1, just on the right, is Dreams of No Thing, No Time (2014), a small green-and-orange watercolor painting of a subject that likely looks familiar: the sun on the horizon. Broad brushstrokes swept in half circles across the canvas render the composition abstract and[.....]

Home and Away: Chien-chi Chang and Chen Chieh-jen at the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation

Chen Chieh-jen Realm of Reverberations, installation view at Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation image courtesy SCAF

The word “home” has elusive, slippery connotations. In Chinese, the character “jia” (家) also means “family.” It suggests notions of sanctuary, shelter, belonging. But for some the meanings are more complicated. For the marginalized, the outsiders, the lost ones in our midst, it reminds them of all that is missing. For others, in a world crisscrossed by a diaspora of dislocated people seeking safety and[.....]

Isa Genzken: Retrospective at MCA Chicago

Installation view, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, MCA Chicago. April 12-August 3, 2014. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Isa Genzken: Retrospective—an expansive four-decade survey of the German artist’s work at MCA Chicago featuring sculpture, film, installation, painting, and photography—is the fact that it was all made by the same person. Over the course of her career, Genzken has successfully assimilated a wide array of styles without losing sight of a handful of core concerns: architectural structure, the[.....]

Interview with Josh Short

Josh Short. Going to Church, 2014; installation view, The Warehouse, Salina Art Center. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: April Engstrom.

I’ve recently been introduced to the term prairie madness. It’s fictional—not founded in medicine—but it captured my imagination all the same. Artist Josh Short laughed as he explained it to me: The gist is that one can be driven to psychosis by the far-flung expansiveness of the Midwest. Characters in novels have been driven to tears by the isolation, the seemingly never-ending wind, and their[.....]

Walter Robinson: Sic Transit Gloria Mundi at Catharine Clark Gallery

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maria Porges reviews Walter Robinson: Sic Transit Gloria Mundi at Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco. What are we to think about an Egyptian funerary boat powered by[.....]

David Altmejd: Juices at Andrea Rosen Gallery

David Altmejd. The Flux and the Puddle, 2014; Plexiglas, quartz, polystyrene, expandable foam, epoxy clay, epoxy gel, resin, synthetic hair, clothing, leather shoes, thread, mirror, plaster, acrylic paint, latex paint, metal wire, glass eyes, sequin, ceramic, synthetic flowers, synthetic branches, glue, gold, feathers, steel, coconuts, aqua resin, burlap, lighting system including fluorescent lights, Sharpie ink, wood; 129 x 252 x 281 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Andrea Rosen Gallery.

In the main space of Andrea Rosen Gallery, David Altmejd’s gridded plastic network The Flux and the Puddle forms a labyrinthine rectangle—a wrinkle in time. In an homage to science and metaphysics, behind a network of clear vitrines, a series of human-animal hybrids construct themselves out of resin, epoxy, and clay, morphing in and out of candied fruits as harbingers of a kind of alternate evolutionary[.....]

Fan Mail: Rachel Brumer

Rachel Brumer. Memory’s Main Gate XI, 2008; van dyke on hand dyed pima cotton, acrylic, wax; 22.5” x 29” inches. Image courtesy of Mark Frey.

Transitioning from one distinct medium to another is often a challenge—one that many artists attempt. However, not all accomplish it with the seeming ease of Rachel Brumer. Working in varying combinations of textile, installation, sculpture, photography, and collage, Brumer diligently investigates a number of subjects. Foremost in her work is an almost pathological focus on remembering and honoring people, places, and moments through what she[.....]