Posts Tagged ‘Installation’

Red in View at the Whitney Museum of American Art

MPA , Entrance, 2014–2016; Pigmented inkjet print mounted on mat board and painted wood; 7 × 7 in. Courtesy of MPA and the Whitney Museum

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Jasa McKenzie assesses Red in View at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Red in View by MPA aims to explore the potential[…..]

Mickalene Thomas: Waiting on a Prime-Time Star

Mickalene Thomas, Shinique: Now I Know, 2015; Rhinestones, acrylic, and oil on wood panel. Image courtesy of the artist and Galerie Nathalie Obadia (Paris and Brussels).

The self is a slippery thing—an entity built on slippery grounds and shaped by slippery forces. The French psychotherapist Jacques Lacan perhaps put it best that “the self” is both something we build as well as imagine; it is located between the fictions of the ego and the fictions of the unconscious, where unity between the two remains impossible but deeply necessary for one’s development.[1][…..]

From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art at the Contemporary Jewish Museum

From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art, 2016; installation view, San Francisco, CA. Courtesy of the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Photo: JKA Photography.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Carlos Kong reviews From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco. Memories take[…..]

Jibade-Khalil Huffman: Kush Is My Cologne at Anat Ebgi

Jibade-Khalil Huffman. By The Author of Another Country and Nobody Knows My Name, 2017; transparencies in double light box; 35 x 31 x 6 1/8 in. Courtesy of Anat Ebgi. Photo: Michael Underwood.

Jibade-Khalil Huffman’s solo exhibition at Anat Ebgi, Kush Is My Cologne, lifts its title from a track on Gucci Mane’s 2009 major label debut, The State vs. Radric Davis. The allusion is one of many in Huffman’s exhibition that indicate his fixation with the popular nodes that drive contemporary cultural production, particularly, the profundity and cultural insistence of hip-hop in a world that often refuses[…..]

Fan Mail: Ludovic Duchâteau

Ludovic Duchâteau. Dynamic Confirmation, 2016 (installation view); plastic, epoxy, clay, latex, copper, steel, acrylic; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Ludovic Duchâteau’s work presents visions of ambivalent technologies, uncannily inert and uncertain in their impotence. His objects are often scattered and sprawled along gallery floors or empty streets as if discarded or depleted. Their forms resemble our technological objects and fantasies, and imagery from science fiction. They look almost like crashed alien probes or satellites, disconnected from their users or power sources, vaguely threatening in[…..]

Mixed Use by Jess Jones and Gaudi-Juju by Lillian Blades at Swan Coach House Gallery

Lillian Blades. Juju-Veil, 2017; mixed media. Image courtesy of the artist and Swan Coach House Gallery (Atlanta, GA).

Dual presentations of artists can often result in hasty hierarchies of “better vs. worse” or “master vs. apprentice.” However, the recent exhibition of Jess Jones’ and Lillian Blades’ work at Atlanta’s Swan Coach House Gallery tosses all that patriarchal competitive comparison out the door by presenting the strength of their individual practices, as well as their shared interest in the history and procedures of craft.[1][…..]

From the Archives – Vesna Pavlović: LOST ART at Zeitgeist Gallery

Vesna Pavlović. Video Still, May 25, 1979, Television, Belgrade. 2015. Endura metallic print. 20.5 x 14 inches. Image courtesy of the artist and Zeitgeist Gallery (Nashville, TN).

“Instability, fragmentation, and brokenness”—these words could easily refer to the current global political situation, yet here they specify the 20th-century regime of Josep Broz Tito, a Yugoslavian revolutionary whose later presidential reign was marked by repression and human-rights violations. In street protests, as in galleries and museums, citizens around the world are turning to imaginative expressions of their fears and objections, and we are reminded of the[…..]