Posts Tagged ‘Installation’

An Atlas of Mirrors: Singapore Biennale 2016

Titarubi. History Repeats Itself, 2016; Gold-plated nutmeg, copper-plated wood, nickel-plated wood, burnt wood, sampan, wood, aluminium, copper, soil, light and nutmeg perfume; Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of Singapore Art Museum.

There is no shortage of mirrors and maps in the fifth iteration of the Singapore Biennale. Glass mirrors in Harumi Yukutake’s Paracosmos (2016) curve around the main circular stairwell of the Singapore Art Museum, dazzling the eye as light hits their multiple reflective surfaces. Dozens of mirrors appear in their reflections; dozens more yet, to the power of infinity, show up in the reflections of their reflections. In[…..]

Sarah Crowner: Touch the Tile

Sarah Crowner. Beetle in the Leaves, 2016; Installation view.

From our friends at Guernica, today we bring you an interview with artist Sarah Crowner. Author Elizabeth Karp-Evans and Crowner discuss her show at MASS MoCA (open through February 2017), her art-historical influences, craft, and constructivism. Crowner states, “I think that art history can be a medium that can be manipulated in the same way that a material, like paint or clay, can be.” This article[…..]

La Ciudad Está Allá Afuera: Demolición, Ocupación y Utopía [The City Is Out There: Demolition, Occupation, and Utopia]

José Adrián Monroy López, Núcleo [Core], 2016; polypropylene weave. Courtesy of Centro Cultural Universitario Tlatelolco, UNAM. Photo: Tania Puente.

If we googled the word “megalopolis,” it is most likely that an image of Mexico City would appear in the search. The capital of Mexico has 9 million inhabitants, and a floating population of almost 2 million people who travel every day from the adjacent suburbs to study, work, and shop. This concentration of humans turns the city into a bustling social and cultural center,[…..]

Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest at the New Museum

Pipilotti Rist. Mercy Garden, 2014; two-channel video and sound installation, color, with carpet; 10:30 min; dimensions variable. Sound by Heinz Rohrer. Courtesy of the Artist, Hauser & Wirth, Luhring Augustine, and New Museum. Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio.

I admit that I’m late to discovering Swiss artist Pipilotti Rist. However, given that she has been producing work since the 1980s, and only in 2016 has received her first major retrospective in New York, Pixel Forest at the New Museum, I may not be the only one. The exhibition as a whole is an immersive environment, where one can easily and pleasurably lose time—an[…..]

Ludovic Duchâteau: In Dreamland at A Stark Project

Ludovic Duchateau. In Dreamland, 2016; installation view, A Stark Project, Berkeley. Courtesy of the Artist and A Stark Project. Photo: Hillary Goidell.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Noah Sudarsky reviews Ludovic Duchâteau: In Dreamland at A Stark Project in Berkeley. French sculptor Ludovic Duchâteau’s first solo show in the[…..]

Tales of Our Time at the Guggenheim Museum

Sun Yuan & Peng Yu. Can’t Help Myself, 2016; Kuka industrial robot, stainless steel and rubber, cellulose ether in colored water, lighting grid with Cognex visual-recognition sensors, and polycarbonate wall with aluminum frame. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection © Sun Yuan & Peng Yu. Photo: David Heald.

Let’s talk about the apocalypse. It looms over Tales of Our Time, an exhibition of newly commissioned works by contemporary Chinese artists at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, from a video installation literally called In The End Is The Word to the 10-foot robotic arm that violently moves blood-red ink in Sun Yuan and Peng Yu’s Can’t Help Myself. Curators Xiaoyu Weng and Hou[…..]

Edgar Arceneaux: Written in Fire and Smoke

Edgar Arceneaux, Until, Until, Until…, 2016; HD video installation, spotlights, coat stand, makeup table, stool, clothing, hats, shoes, drop curtains, bar, monitors, book. Co-commissioned by the MIT List Visual Arts Center and Performa 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects.

Edgar Arcenaux’s exhibition at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center, Written in Fire and Smoke, is relatively modest in scale, occupying the List’s two main galleries. But while the exhibition is physically constrained, conceptually it is oversized—colossal, even. Written in Fire and Smoke is comprised of three bodies of work, all of which manifest through different material approaches. All, however, share the complexity that defines Arceneaux’s[…..]