Posts Tagged ‘Julio César Morales’

From the Archives – Curating Activism: An Interview with Julio César Morales

Julio César Morales, "Undocumented Interventions #1," 2011. Watercolor and ink on paper. 32.5 x 24.5 in.

Today from our archives we bring you an interview with Julio César Morales, curator of the Arizona State University Art Museum in Tempe. Morales says, “I am working to develop the largest Latin American video archive in the U.S., housed in the city most threatening to Latinos in the U.S. This juxtaposition reflects the ongoing struggles between the U.S. and Mexico and their parasitic need[…..]

Queens Nails is Dead at Queens Nails Gallery

When confronted with endings, we mourn and ultimately accept. We feel some mix of disappointment and satisfaction that we were there before it ended, excitement that it happened, and sometimes relief that it is over. Queens Nails is Dead is the last exhibition for Queens Nails Gallery, an artist-run nonprofit gallery that opened in San Francisco’s Mission District in 2004. Featuring the work of Daniel[…..]

#Hashtags: Liberaceón

In his 2011 video, “Liberaceón,” Chris E. Vargas inserts radical, queer rhetoric into the arguably apolitical, high zest that was Wladziu Valentino Liberace’s life. HBO’s biopic about Liberace is headed to Cannes this month. Jacqueline Clay’s article was originally published September 5, 2011. History, like most things, is subjective. What is culled from individual accounts is accepted as fact and eventually translates into some kind[…..]

#Curating Activism: An Interview with Julio César Morales

Julio César Morales is an artist, curator, and educator who recently left the San Francisco Bay Area to become curator at the Arizona State University Art Museum in Tempe. Morales was an adjunct curator at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts from 2008-12, where he created “PAUSE: Practice and Exchange,” a series of solo exhibitions by artists including Allan de Souza, Euan Macdonald, and[…..]

Liberaceón

History, like most things, is subjective. What is culled from individual accounts is accepted as fact and eventually translates into some kind of truth. But truth can be different at any moment—past, present, and future. The events in London were either riots or long overdue, civil unrest.  Depending on whom you ask, in 2005 the people of New Orleans were either looting or just surviving.[…..]