Posts Tagged ‘labor’

Odd Jobs: Danielle Dean

Danielle Dean. Hexafluorosilicic, 2015; installation view at Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome back to Odd Jobs, where artists talk about their varied and nontraditional career arcs. For this installment, I spoke to Danielle Dean—born to a Nigerian father and an English mother in Alabama—whose interdisciplinary practice draws from this multinational background. Her work explores the interpellation of thoughts, feelings, and social relations by power structures working through news, advertising, political speech, and digital media. She has[…..]

Best of 2014 – #Hashtags: Culture, Class, and the New Economy

Stephanie Syjuco. Bedazzle a Tech Bus (I Mock Up Your Ideas): John Gourley "Gringo" Bus, 2014. Digital image. Submission to Mission Local's "Bedazzle a Tech Bus" Call for Entries.

As part of our ten-year anniversary celebrations, we’re considering the best of a decade of arts criticism. Today’s selection comes from our executive director Michele Carlson, who writes, “I reread this essay the same day that San Francisco’s first fleet of self-driving Uber cars rolled out and one sailed straight through a red light in front of SFMOMA. This comes on the heels of the[…..]

Odd Jobs: Charles Gaines

Charles Gaines. Numbers and Trees V. Landscape #8: Orange Crow, 1978; acrylic sheet, acrylic paint, watercolor, photograph. 46 5⁄8 × 38 5⁄8 in. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

For the past forty years, Charles Gaines has employed system-based methodologies to his artmaking in order to critique subjective expression within art. Influenced by Tantric Buddhist diagrams in the late 1960s, his photographs, drawings, and works on paper investigate how rule-based procedures construct order and meaning. Gaines is also a highly regarded educator at the California Institute of the Arts. He received his MFA from the Rochester[…..]

10 Questions for Seth Curcio

Daily Serving's founder, Seth Curcio.

Happy birthday, Daily Serving! This month marks our tenth year of bringing you some of the smartest art writing, and since this is such a momentous anniversary, we’re going to be celebrating for the next few months. To kick off the festivities, today we bring you an excerpt from our interview with Daily Serving’s founder, Seth Curcio. Back in 2006, Seth started this site from Charleston,[…..]

#Hashtags – Toward the Black Museum

Hammer Projects: Simone Leigh, September 17, 2016–January 8, 2017. Installation view, courtesy of Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.

#museums #race #representation #institutional critique The recent controversy over Kelley Walker’s exhibition Direct Drive at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, and the departure of that exhibition’s curator, Jeffrey Uslip, was another reminder that museums are not built and programmed for all audiences alike. As this column has taken up questions of race in the museum on numerous occasions (and class in the museum, and[…..]

Odd Jobs: Jibz Cameron/Dynasty Handbag

Dynasty Handbag. Remote Penetration / Stain of History, 2013 (still); video; 7:29. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome to the first issue of “Odd Jobs,” in which we explore artists’ day jobs. Many artists have held very odd jobs in order to support their art practice, and more often than not these jobs go unspoken and yet end up informing their work. Today we chat with Jibz Cameron, a Los Angeles-based performance and video artist who performs as her alter ego, Dynasty[…..]

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Education on Contingency

Christian Nagler. Yoga for Adjuncts, 2014. Workshop at  Valuing Labor in the Arts: A Practicum. Photo by Joanna Fuller. Courtesy of Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley.

For this month’s Summer Session we’re going Back to School, and today we bring you Anuradha Vikram’s #Hashtags column addressing adjunct labor. Higher education in the United States has become increasingly dependent upon this contingent and precarious workforce, and Vikram argues that its inherent instability is particularly jarring given the Marxian configuration of labor that underpins much of contemporary art rhetoric. This article was originally published on May 5,[…..]