Posts Tagged ‘labor’

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Education on Contingency

Christian Nagler. Yoga for Adjuncts, 2014. Workshop at  Valuing Labor in the Arts: A Practicum. Photo by Joanna Fuller. Courtesy of Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley.

For this month’s Summer Session we’re going Back to School, and today we bring you Anuradha Vikram’s #Hashtags column addressing adjunct labor. Higher education in the United States has become increasingly dependent upon this contingent and precarious workforce, and Vikram argues that its inherent instability is particularly jarring given the Marxian configuration of labor that underpins much of contemporary art rhetoric. This article was originally published on May 5,[…..]

Summer Session – Open Letter by Frances Richard

Andrea Bowers. Help the Work Along, 2012, Installation view at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects; Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

On the final day of our month considering labor in the arts, we bring you an open letter and call to action from Senior Adjunct Frances Richard on labor, value, and unionization. This letter was originally published in an email to the administration at California College of the Arts on June 2, 2016. Dear President Beal, Provost Carland, and members of the Administration Negotiating Team,[…..]

Summer Session – Labor and Looking “Professional”

"Professional" clip art.

As we wrap up this month’s Summer Session theme of labor, today we direct our readers to Autumn Whitefield-Madrano’s consideration of the entanglements between beauty, self-presentation, and maintenance at the New Inquiry. In attempting to specify what it means it look “professional,” Whitefield-Madrano finds that labor, both real and perceived, fundamentally underpins this stylistic distinction: “You said you wanted to look professional, and I had no idea what that meant.[…..]

Summer Session – Mónica Mayer: Si Tiene Dudas… Pregunte at Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo

Mónica Mayer. Lo normal, 1978 (detail); print intervened with stamps, 10 cards. Courtesy of the artist and Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo.

In keeping with this month’s Summer Session theme of labor, today we revisit Tania Puente’s essay on feminist artist Mónica Mayer’s retrocollective at Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo. Among Mayer’s socially reflexive work is an emphasis on revealing women’s hidden labor, especially the emotional labor of motherhood, marriage, and sexual objectification. This article was first published on March 1, 2016.  Si Tiene Dudas… Pregunte [When in Doubt… Ask][…..]

Summer Session – Help Desk: Getting Paid for Curatorial Work

Kerry James Marshall. Portrait of a Curator (In Memory of Beryl Wright), 2009; acrylic on PVC, 30 7/8 x 24 7/8 x 1 7/8 in.

This week wraps up our month of regarding labor in the arts: work, innovation, collaboration, compensation, and leisure. In this Help Desk column, Bean Gilsdorf answers a question about making money from curatorial pursuits with some help from Fatos Üstek and Kuba Szreder. The article was originally published on May 9, 2016. I’m a professional curator with over a decade of experience, mostly as a salaried professional. I’d[…..]

Summer Session – Valuing Labor in the Arts: Prompts for Eight Workshops

Yoga for Adjuncts: The Somatics of Human Capital workshop, Valuing Laboring in the Arts practicum, April 19, 2014, UC Berkeley Art Museum. Courtesy of the Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley. Photo: Megan Hoetger.

Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we bring you an excerpt from “Yoga for Adjuncts: The Somatics of Human Capital,” a workshop led by Christian Nagler on April 19, 2014. The workshop was part of a daylong practicum at the Arts Research Center (ARC) at the University of California, Berkeley, entitled “Valuing Labor in the Arts.” This “prompt” was originally published on our sister site Art Practical on April 3,[…..]

Summer Session – Baker/Rapoport/Wick

Video still from Baker/Rapoport/Wick, 1977.

Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we direct you to video documentation of the work of Baker/Rapoport/Wick, a collective formed by the artists Mary Winder Baker, Debra Rapoport, and Susan Wick. The artists discuss the nature of their installation and performance work, saying, “We make certain assumptions that people can work collectively and collaboratively, but the reason we get hired to do things is because people[…..]