Posts Tagged ‘landscape’

Yaakov Israel: The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art

Yaakov Israel. Abandoned Water Park, Dead Sea, 2010; c-print. Courtesy the artist and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, South Carolina.

In 1981, John Baldessari said, “Probably one of the worst things to happen to photography is that cameras have viewfinders…” but artist Yaakov Israel would certainly disagree.[1] Israel’s photographs in The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina, are carefully constructed. Israeli-born and -based, Israel relishes the serendipitous encounters he’s had while exploring[…..]

Fan Mail: Matt Shallenberger

Matt Shallenberger. 2735 from the series False Pond, 2014; archival pigment print; 32 x 40 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Matt Shallenberger approaches his photographic subjects—most often landscapes—as a cartographer approaches a new territory. As he discovers information by following the sight lines of mountains, rivers, boundaries, horizons, and the ever-changing position of the sun or the moon, he always takes into account the history and prior records of his subjects. While he works consistently with darkened, blissfully moody vistas, Shallenberger’s research into his subjects[…..]

Sarah Christianson: When the Landscape Is Quiet Again at SF Camerawork

Sarah Christianson. Corn field, Antler, ND, September 2013, 2013. C-print, 20 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Sarah Christianson‘s When the Landscape Is Quiet Again: North Dakota’s Oil Boom at SF Camerawork. Author Larissa Archer notes, “Christianson doesn’t try to appeal to emotions with her photographs. They encourage a process by which the viewer mentally forms a bridge between the damning information about the subjects (here, provided by the captions) and the[…..]

Nature is Not Human Hearted

In Art, I am generally not a fan of beautiful landscapes. That is not to say that I do not appreciate the inherent splendor of nature, it just always seems too picturesque and subsequently too easy.  The source of my aversion is popular visual culture’s inundation of images showing over-saturated suns rising or setting, paths and docks receding into the distance, and natural monuments impressing[…..]

Through Windows, Through Walls: Driss Ouadahi at Hosfelt Gallery

Painting has long offered codes for interpreting landscape, and from it a perspective on our place in the world. Claude Monet’s series of haystacks, bridges and the Rouen cathedral give us landscape as a clock, an unfolding of the hours of the day and time spent looking, comparing, recording and looking again. Monet had the luck to be surrounded by gardens and fields, but how[…..]

Mystery and Medium at Pictura Gallery: Recent Photographs by Adam Thorman and Laura Plageman

Adam Thorman and Laura Plageman, Installation View, Pictura Gallery

Due to several recent shows on the subject, I have lately been pondering the enduring yet amorphous allure of landscape in photography.  Among the exhibitions currently on view, Pictura Gallery’s exhibition of photographs by Adam Thorman and Laura Plageman offers an especially engaging encounter with the genre. Displayed on opposite sides of the bisected space, each artist’s series—Thorman’s What Light Remains in the Absence and[…..]

Surveying the Terrain at the RISD Museum’s “American View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now”

Lee Friedlander, Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1971. Museum purchase with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts. © Lee Friedlander, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design, Providence.

A visually compelling, conceptually provocative consideration of the photographic medium, American View:  Landscape Photography 1865 to Now is anything but the kind of straightforward overview such a title suggests.  Showcasing works drawn primarily from the Rhode Island School of Design’s rich photography collection, American View shifts deftly between and among periods and styles and, in so doing, illuminates the ever-evolving relationship between landscape and photographic image. Upon entering the[…..]