Posts Tagged ‘landscape’

Mark Steinmetz: South at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art

Mark Steinmetz. Off I-40, Knoxville, TN. 1993. Silver gelatin print. Image: Courtesy of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans.

Mark Steinmetz’s current exhibition at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art has narrative ambition, but also asks difficult questions about the meaning of “straight photography” and its relationship to the documentary tradition. In what sense are documentary photographs social records, deadpan descriptions, or allegorical explications of the artist’s worldview? Are they a series of facile maneuvers, or as critic Garry Badger once claimed, “an existential[…..]

Awst & Walther: Ground Control, An Interdisciplinary Forum at PSM Gallery

Awst & Walther. Ground Control: An interdisciplinary forum, 2015 (still); digital animation; infinite loop. Courtesy of the Artists and PSM Gallery, Berlin. Photo: André Wunstorf.

In the dark at PSM Gallery in Berlin, a digital animation is silently breathing. It appears as an inverted landscape split in equal parts by land and sky. A field recedes into the horizon, with a mass of permafrost above and mostly clear blue atmosphere below. Green shrubs flop and slide loosely on the screen, wriggling and dismorphic, moving as they would in an acid[…..]

Fan Mail: Jason Engelund

Jason Engelund. Drawing with the Sun & Sea 60, 2015; photograph; 34 x 44 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Photographer Jason Engelund is distinctly aware of the conceptual and metaphorical capacities of landscape. Engelund works with a single series of photographs at a time to capture one motif, location, technique, or compositional strategy from various positions. However, these discrete bodies of work resonate with one another as part of a long-term vision—an ongoing project, or more aptly a study of photographic mechanisms and the[…..]

Fan Mail: Marc Newton

Marc Newton. Constructed Paradise: Untitled 17, 2013; archival inkjet print; 17 x 21 inches.  Courtesy the artist.

The waning glow of the warm desert sun hangs in the air around a lone female figure. She sits nestled atop a rock formation amid yellow grasses and low, twisted trees. As she gazes lovingly toward the fading sun with trim arms folded over her legs, a sense of hard-earned and well-deserved calm settles in, as though this communication with the landscape has rejuvenated her[…..]

Yaakov Israel: The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art

Yaakov Israel. Abandoned Water Park, Dead Sea, 2010; c-print. Courtesy the artist and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, South Carolina.

In 1981, John Baldessari said, “Probably one of the worst things to happen to photography is that cameras have viewfinders…” but artist Yaakov Israel would certainly disagree.[1] Israel’s photographs in The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina, are carefully constructed. Israeli-born and -based, Israel relishes the serendipitous encounters he’s had while exploring[…..]

Fan Mail: Matt Shallenberger

Matt Shallenberger. 2735 from the series False Pond, 2014; archival pigment print; 32 x 40 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Matt Shallenberger approaches his photographic subjects—most often landscapes—as a cartographer approaches a new territory. As he discovers information by following the sight lines of mountains, rivers, boundaries, horizons, and the ever-changing position of the sun or the moon, he always takes into account the history and prior records of his subjects. While he works consistently with darkened, blissfully moody vistas, Shallenberger’s research into his subjects[…..]

Sarah Christianson: When the Landscape Is Quiet Again at SF Camerawork

Sarah Christianson. Corn field, Antler, ND, September 2013, 2013. C-print, 20 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Sarah Christianson‘s When the Landscape Is Quiet Again: North Dakota’s Oil Boom at SF Camerawork. Author Larissa Archer notes, “Christianson doesn’t try to appeal to emotions with her photographs. They encourage a process by which the viewer mentally forms a bridge between the damning information about the subjects (here, provided by the captions) and the[…..]