Posts Tagged ‘language’

Speaking Directly: Interview with Tony Discenza

Tony Discenza, TRANSPORTED, 2010.  Vinyl on aluminum, 30 x 24 inches

Tony Discenza’s text-based work is concise yet absurd: the tone is often matter-of-fact while the content is speculative and fanciful. The appropriated formats of a street sign or a book’s teaser page provide an internal logic that holds the tension of this paradox quite neatly. Obviously, I’m a fan, so I asked him to chat with me about his recent projects. Discenza’s solo and collaborative[…..]

Alejandro Diaz

The Happy Lion is currently presenting The World’s Largest Cardboard Sign and Other New Works, a solo show of language-related works, including sculpture, neon and installation, by New York-based artist Alejandro Diaz.  The centerpiece of the exhibition, The World’s Largest Cardboard Sign, 2009, is 10 feet tall, 12 feet wide, and weighs 200 pounds.  Diaz elevates the self-referential sign to art object through the use[…..]

Matthew Brannon

Viewing the work of Matthew Brannon is like watching a foreign film with no subtitles–you can understand and appreciate the imagery to the extent that you might even form your own idea of what the storyline might be, but there will always be a disconnect between your imagination and the true intention of the film, as told through its dialog. Similarly, Matthew Brannon’s letterpress prints[…..]

The Third Chapter of Blum & Poe

  In 1994, the year Kara Walker graduated from RISD, Jeff Koons made his first balloon dog, and OJ’s white Bronco became a celebrity, Timothy Blum and Jeff Poe opened a gallery in Santa Monica. In 2003, the year Charles Saatchi called white walled galleries “antiseptic” and Arnold Schwarzenegger became California’s governor, Blum & Poe relocated to Culver City. Now, in 2009, the year Holland Cotter proclaimed that ‘The[…..]

On the Scene

The Department of Photography’s continuing series On the Scene showcases the Art Institute of Chicago‘s commitment to collecting and exhibiting the most dynamic new work by emerging artists. The third exhibition in the series explores the diverse range of art being produced by Jason Lazarus, Wolfgang Ploger, and Zoe Strauss. Jason Lazarus’s installation grew out of the artist’s fascination with the family snapshot and its durability in our digital[…..]

Why do we do the things we do

Emily Floyd, The Cultural Studies Reader (2001) Photo; Eva Fernandez For the exhibition, Why do we do the things we do, nine artists turn the mirror on their creative process with honesty and biting self irony. This group exhibition at the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, Australia, curated by Jacqueline Doughty, tackles the often misunderstood process of making art, with many of the artists playing[…..]