Posts Tagged ‘London’

From the Archives – Whose Map Is It? New Mapping by Artists

BouchraKhalili

Today from our archives we bring you Kelly Nosari’s assessment of Whose Map Is It? at the Institute of International Visual Arts in London. Considering the wars currently being waged over land in Palestine, the Ukraine, Syria, and South Sudan (to name just a few), it is interesting to note how artists approach the representation of territory. This article was originally published on July 8,[.....]

Phyllida Barlow: Fifty Years of Drawing at Hauser & Wirth

Phyllida Barlow. Fifty Years of Drawing, 2014; installation view, Hauser & Wirth, London. Courtesy of the Artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Alex Delfanne.

Phyllida Barlow has upped her game in the last five years with a string of international blockbuster shows and commissions. Omnipresent as she currently is, one would think that Barlow has always enjoyed this kind of success, but that isn’t the case; the work hadn’t received the kind of attention that anoints an artist as “successful” until her Baltic show in 2004. As she is in[.....]

Eric Yahnker: Sticks and Drones at Paradise Row Gallery

Eric Yahnker. Crimea River, 2014, charcoal, graphite and ink on paper, 40 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

The cleverly titled Sticks and Drones at Paradise Row Gallery is Los Angeles-based artist Eric Yahnker’s London debut. On entering the gallery, viewers are confronted with Daddy Issues (2014), a crudely carved wooden cobra with the words “Daddy Issues” lovingly wood-burned into its hood. With a sequined magenta bow on the middle of its head, it’s the Honey Boo Boo of county-fair handicrafts. “Daddy Issues”[.....]

From the Archives – Abolishing War: A Conversation with Krzysztof Wodiczko

Krzysztof Wodiczko, War Veteran Vehicle, Liverpool, 2009. Photography courtesy Robert Ochshorn.

Today is Memorial Day in the United States, a day to remember the men and women who died while serving in our armed forces. In honor of this day, we bring you author Michelle Schultz’s interview with artist Krzysztof Wodiczko, who contends, “There is an extremely thick wall that separates those who know what war is and those who don’t.” This interview was originally published on January 2, 2012. Krzysztof[.....]

Michael Riedel: Laws of Form at David Zwirner, London

Michael Riedel. Laws of Form, 2014; installation view, David Zwirner, London. Courtesy the Artists and David Zwirner, New York/London.

“There’s no content being produced, because I’m in the first generation that grew up digital…. We are just transferring all the time: tape, CDs, and now the clouds.”[1] Something radical has been happening for a while in art that has been evading easy classification. The digital fold has facilitated a giant mash-up of layers upon layers of information composed from fragments of fragments. Sound bites, video[.....]

Michael Craig-Martin: Objects of our Time at Alan Cristea Gallery

(from left to right) Michael Craig-Martin. Objects of our Time: Takeaway coffee, 2014; Objects of our Time: Memory stick, 2014; both works, series of 12 screenprints, edition of 50; 50.0 x 50.0 cm. Courtesy the Artist and Alan Cristea Gallery. NPC.

Is a glass of water just a glass of water? Consider it for a fraction of a second and suddenly the glass of water carries a lot of Kosuthian baggage—the mind attaches a label to it, compares it to an ideal, then judges its function, and its value changes. Deconstruct the contextual outcome of that mental layering, and the glass of water not only offers[.....]

BP Walk through British Art at Tate Britain

Installation view; Robert Peake, Lady Anne Pope, 1615; Oil on wood & Paul Van Somer, lady Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent, c.1619; Oil on wood. Courtesy of Tate Britain. Photo: A. E. Driggs.

Can you remember the last time you were really excited about seeing your local museum’s pre-modern permanent collection? Familiarity is the antagonist for the seasoned art viewer, and growing weary of a permanent collection becomes inescapable. Perhaps this is excusable in the case of a small collection in a provincial museum—but quite a different thing when the collection bills itself as the nation’s definitive authority[.....]