Posts Tagged ‘London’

BP Walk through British Art at Tate Britain

Installation view; Robert Peake, Lady Anne Pope, 1615; Oil on wood & Paul Van Somer, lady Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent, c.1619; Oil on wood. Courtesy of Tate Britain. Photo: A. E. Driggs.

Can you remember the last time you were really excited about seeing your local museum’s pre-modern permanent collection? Familiarity is the antagonist for the seasoned art viewer, and growing weary of a permanent collection becomes inescapable. Perhaps this is excusable in the case of a small collection in a provincial museum—but quite a different thing when the collection bills itself as the nation’s definitive authority[.....]

From the Archives – Blinded by the Hype: A Spotty Affair

Damien Hirst, Levorphanol, 1995, household gloss on canvas. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2012, Courtesy Gagosian Gallery. Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates.

Do you ever wonder where you were exactly a year or two ago? What you were doing, or who you were talking to—or about? Today we take a little trip down memory lane to this very date two years ago, to reassess Damien Hirst’s oeuvre and the art-market chatter around exhibiting his spot paintings at all eleven Gagosian galleries around the world. Now that the art[.....]

From the Archives – Jacob Hashimoto: The Other Sun

Today from our archives we bring you Margaret Zuckerman‘s review of Jacob Hashimoto‘s 2012 exhibition at Ronchini Gallery in London. Hashimoto has a new exhibition opening in February at Martha Otero Gallery in Los Angeles, hopefully as “buoyant, ethereal, and celebratory” as the work reviewed here. This article was originally published on July 19, 2012. American-born Jacob Hashimoto’s eye-catching exhibition, The Other Sun, at London’s Ronchini Gallery in[.....]

Sarah Lucas: SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble at Whitechapel Gallery

Sarah Lucas. Installation view, 2013 Courtesy Whitechapel Gallery, London, Photo: Stephen White

Think 1990s YBA and what artworks come to mind? A pickled shark, a bawdy story tent, a head made of frozen blood… and a photo of Sarah Lucas looking defiant with a limp cigarette in her mouth. Or better yet, her bent, worn mattress with anthropomorphically inserted fruit and veg with metal bucket. Mostly, her pieces distill the human body down to a sexualised and/or[.....]

From Wings to Fins: Morris Louis and Cyprien Gaillard at Sprüth Magers

Taking its name from a 2006 feature in National Geographic, Sprüth Magers’ latest London exhibition, From Wings to Fins, features the work of color-field painter Morris Louis and Cyprien Gaillard, a young French artist recently established within the international circuit. While Louis’ position is firmly mid-century, Cyprien Gaillard is a locus of tragic postmodernism. Drawn to modernism’s ideals, contradictions, and historical failures, Gaillard has risen on his[.....]

Li Songsong: We Have Betrayed the Revolution at Pace London

Li Songsong. Guests Are All Welcome, 2013; Oil on canvas, 120cm x 120cm. Li Songsong: We Have Betrayed the Revolution, 2013; Courtesy Pace Gallery.

It would be easy to come to Li Songsong’s show at Pace London with certain assumptions, projections, and ideas about the last ten years of contemporary painting from China. Assumptions informed by how galleries have vulgarly packaged Chinese contemporary art as a struggle for freer (market) expression. Projections on what it means for an artist to make a painting in post-Deng Xiaoping‘s China. Ideas built[.....]

Long Ago and Not True Anyway at Waterside Contemporary

Mekitar Grabedian, MG, 2006 (still); Video; 2:05. Courtesy of Waterside Contemporary, London.

In Long Ago and Not True Anyway at Waterside Contemporary, curator Pierre d’Alancaisez explores a kind of history that exists beyond the dry material of archives, records, and established national narratives. Instead, in this small London gallery nearly hidden around a corner among Islington’s high-density residential buildings, this exhibition’s artists and artworks blur the borders between uncertain subjective experience and the history it inhabits. Taking[.....]