Posts Tagged ‘Los Angeles’

Best of 2015 – Jennifer Moon, Jemima Wyman, and Robby Herbst at Commonwealth & Council

Jemima Wyman. Conjuring Radical Openness, 2015; Bronze; 20 x 19 x 9 in.; Unique edition of 3 + 1 A.P. Courtesy the artist and Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles.

Jemima Wyman. Conjuring Power, 2015; DIY fabric-prints on cotton poplin, painted steel rods; Site-specific installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles.

As part of our ten-year anniversary celebrations, we’re considering the best of a decade of arts criticism. Today’s selection comes from the editor in chief of our sister publication, Art Practical: Kara Q. Smith opines, “It’s not easy to write about three shows in 1,000 words, but what I love about this review by Matt Stromberg is his ability to nod to the [California] art history that[…..]

Best of 2010 – L.A. Expanded: Sunday Boys

Andy Warhol, Dennis Hopper, Screen Tests Reel #4, 1964-65.

We’re looking back over a decade of Daily Serving’s greatest hits, and today’s selection comes from Shotgun Reviews editor Emily Holmes: “The column L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast was started in 2010 by Catherine Wagley, who wrote about the multifaceted Los Angeles scene from an approachable, personal voice. One of her finest pieces in that first year explored masculinity and the politics of gendered[…..]

Hashtags: House of Horrors

Pedro Reyes. Doomocracy (Voting Room), 2016.

#privatization #gentrification #immigration #violence #history #freedom At the time of this writing, Pedro Reyes’ Doomocracy installation at the Brooklyn Army Terminal feels like a relic of a bygone era. Just one week after the project’s close, it is difficult for this writer to remember what it felt like to laugh at a funhouse of political horrors, featuring privatized national parks, designer oxygen boutiques, anti-abortion pep rallies, and[…..]

Carmen Winant: Pictures of Women Working at Skibum MacArthur

Carmen Winant. Pictures of Women Working, 2016; installation view. Courtesy of Skibum MacArthur, Los Angeles. Photo: Brica Wilcox.

The question of work becomes complex when one asks who is doing it, and for whom. The precarious labor of domestic chores gone unfairly compensated, the frequently banal performance of activism and demonstration, sex work—these labors remain concerns in our current social and economic spheres, and reflect a problematic, historical trajectory that often fails to incorporate and value unseen, marginalized work and workers.[1] In Pictures[…..]

Odd Jobs: Jibz Cameron/Dynasty Handbag

Dynasty Handbag. Remote Penetration / Stain of History, 2013 (still); video; 7:29. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome to the first issue of “Odd Jobs,” in which we explore artists’ day jobs. Many artists have held very odd jobs in order to support their art practice, and more often than not these jobs go unspoken and yet end up informing their work. Today we chat with Jibz Cameron, a Los Angeles-based performance and video artist who performs as her alter ego, Dynasty[…..]

#Hashtags: Water Water Everywhere

Teresa Margolles. La Sombra (The Shade), 2016; concrete veneer on wood. Artwork commissioned by City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) for CURRENT:LA Water. Photo by Panic Studio LA.

#environment #conservation #access #resources #water #public art #civic art #biennials Los Angeles is a metropolis built on a delusion: that engineering can overcome a basic lack of sufficient resources to meet the popular need. Five years into a severe drought, one would think conservation would be on everyone’s mind, but the clean cars and green lawns all around town suggest otherwise. To increase discussion of[…..]

Alex Da Corte: A Season in He’ll at Art + Practice

Alex Da Corte, A Season in He'll, installation view. Courtesy of Art + Practice, Los Angeles. Photo by Joshua White.

There is a scene early on in Lamberto Bava’s 1986 low-budget Italo-horror schlock fest Demons 2: A sinister figure is seen limping down a hallway. He enters a room, picks up a knife that is covered in what looks like blood, and wipes it on his soiled apron. The camera then reveals the source of the gory substance: a jar of syrup that has been[…..]