Posts Tagged ‘Los Angeles’

Noah Davis: Imitation of Wealth at MOCA Storefront

Noah Davis. Imitation of Wealth, 2015; installation view, MOCA: storefront. Courtesy of the Artist and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Photo: Cameron Crone and Carter Seddon.

For the next three years, the estimable Underground Museum, co-founded by husband and wife Noah and Karon Davis, will bring artworks from Museum of Contemporary Art’s (MOCA) permanent collection to its unassuming storefront in the largely black and Latino working-class neighborhoods of West Adams and Crenshaw. Reciprocally, MOCA presents Noah Davis’ Imitation of Wealth, which was first exhibited at the Underground Museum, in its new[…..]

From the Archives: Pierre Huyghe at LACMA

Pierre Huyghe. Untitled (Human Mask), 2014. Film. Courtesy of the artist; Hauser and Wirth, London; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Anna Lena, Paris. © Pierre Huyghe

This month marks the opening of the first major Australian solo exhibition of Pierre Huyghe’s work at the TarraWarra Museum of Art, so today we revisit this review by Alex Bigman, who assesses the humor and mythology of Huyghe’s retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. This article was originally published on January 21, 2015. There is a scene in Pierre Huyghe’s shadowy, dreamlike film The Host and[…..]

HA HA! BUSINESS! at Luis De Jesus

Joseph Scalan. Meme 2002/2015; C-print, acqueous inkjet prints, pva; 40 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Luis De Jesus. Photo: Calder Yates

Novelist Don DeLillo once quipped, “California deserves whatever it gets. Californians invented the concept of lifestyle. This alone warrants their doom.” This concept is the curatorial mission behind HA HA! BUSINESS!, currently on view at Luis de Jesus, Los Angeles. HA HA! BUSINESS! reprimands what it sees as a jingoistic and self-centered lifestyle—a world filled with social-media fiends who are willing to cut down the[…..]

Peter Saul: Some Crazy Pictures at David Kordansky Gallery

Peter Saul. Singing Sandwich, 2014; acrylic on canvas; 60 x 72 inches. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

In an interview earlier this year, Peter Saul confessed, “I have to admit I’ve been enjoying myself. But through a large part of my life I’ve been desperately trying to think of some good reason for all this, and I haven’t really thought of a good reason. So that’s that.” Saul’s work is the kind that begs critics to ask, “But why?” while simultaneously and[…..]

Matt Siegle: Eddie’s Gulch at Park View

Matt Siegle. I wear denim and soiled ripstop. In the canyon I sport white athletic socks, hiking boots bought used from REI parking lot sale—no cheap Reeboks actually. My t-shirt shaded gray with lightly brassy pit stains. The sweat collects at my hairline at the top of my head. Drips the SPF 30 off the tip of my nose. Chem-UVA-UVB droplets collecting on my chest hair, slithering down my core and abdomen and each notch of my spine. With every passing sun-minute my cotton shirt clings to my torso, closely now. The shirt darkening with perspiration, through the weave of the belt and soaking the 501s, dampens my athletic compression shirts, quads, junk, grime, 2015. Acrylic on FSC-certified plasticized bags mounted to acrylic on linen; 43 x 43 in. Image courtesy of Park View and the Artist.

From our friends at Contemporary Art Review Los Angeles, today we bring you a review of Matt Siegle’s solo show at Park View. Author Lindsay Preston Zappas notes, “Maybe this show would’ve been more successful as a book.” This article was originally published on May 26, 2015. The wall pieces presented in Eddie’s Gulch, a new solo show by Matt Siegle at Park View, are very[…..]

Tom LaDuke: Candles and Lasers at Kohn Gallery

Tom LaDuke. Gloryhole, 2015; acrylic and glitter on canvas over panel; 50 x 42 in. Courtesy the artist and Kohn Gallery, Los Angeles.

Tom LaDuke’s paintings are messy, exuberant, indulgent affairs, cramming multiple techniques and representational modes onto each canvas. These range from total abstraction to meticulous rendering, as paint is smeared, dripped, and airbrushed across the surface, built up into textured accretions, and covered in glitter. Trompe l’oeil competes with pure paint for authenticity. The result is a frenetic, often garish exploration of representation and perception, offering[…..]

Paris Photo Los Angeles

Mohammad Ghazali. Untitled from Tehran a Little to the Right, 2010-2013; expired Polaroid film, 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in. Image courtesy of the Artist and Ag Galerie, Tehran.

With its high-profile galleries and smattering of celebrity artists, curators, and collectors, it would seem that not much differentiates Paris Photo LA from the multitude of art fairs competing for attention in California. Where the fair does stand out, however, is in the way it makes the case for photography as a vibrant medium for contemporary expression. The 1970s saw the rise of an active[…..]