Posts Tagged ‘Maria Porges’

Lou Beach: End of Days at Jack Fischer Gallery

Lou Beach. Poltroons on Parade (Pigeon! Pigeon! Pigeon!), 2016; collage; 33 x 26 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Fischer Gallery. Photo: Lou Beach.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maria Porges reviews Lou Beach: End of Days at Jack Fischer Gallery’s Minnesota Street Project location in San Francisco. In Lou Beach: End[…..]

Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Maria Porges’ review of Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Achieving a successful understanding of the many layers [of the exhibition] yields a devious satisfaction.” This article was originally published on March 22, 2016. When or why does art become the idea of art:[…..]

Juan Carlos Quintana: Retrospectives at Jack Fischer Gallery

Juan Carlos Quintana. Reflections on Exile Part I (Entering the Forest), 2014-15; oil and acrylic on canvas; 84 x 192 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Fischer Gallery, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Juan Carlos Quintana: Retrospectives at Jack Fischer Gallery in San Francisco. Author Maria Porges quotes the artist at the end of the review: “And who is to say what is failure and what is success? As an artist you just need to trust and listen to yourself and keep moving forward.” This article was[…..]

Walter Robinson: Home Grown at the Palo Alto Art Center

Walter Robinson. Spin, 2008; wood, epoxy, steel, and metal flake; 52 x 26 x 22 in. Collection of Donald Kushner. Courtesy of the Palo Alto Art Center.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Walter Robinson: Home Grown at the Palo Alto Art Center. Author Maria Porges notes: “The cumulative effect here is one of nostalgia—sometimes for things that never really existed—mixed with a strange kind of déjà vu. Not only have we been here before, but we will be here again, over and over, as we[…..]

Doug Hall: The Terrible Uncertainty of the Thing Described at SFAI

Doug Hall. The Terrible Uncertainty of the Thing Described, 1987; video still, San Francisco Art Institute, Walter and McBean Galleries. Collection of SFMOMA, purchased through a gift of the Modern Art Council and the San Francisco Art Dealers Association. © Doug Hall. Photo: Gregory Goode.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Doug Hall’s The Terrible Uncertainty of the Thing Described, currently on view at the Walter and McBean Galleries of the San Francisco Art Institute. Author Maria Porges notes: “Perhaps the most fascinating thing about Hall’s seminal work is its quality of timelessness.” This article was originally published on May 21, 2015. In 1989, the San Francisco[…..]

Bill Owens: Suburbanites and Socialites at Mills College Art Museum

Bill Owens. Untitled [Baton Practice], ca. 1973. Gelatin silver print, 7 7/8 x 10 in. Gift of Marion Brenner and Robert Harshorn Shimshak. Courtesy of Mills College Art Museum, Oakland.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Maria Porges’ review of Bill Owens: Suburbanites and Socialites at Mills College Art Museum. The author notes, “When I think about the tidal wave of changes that were moving through the political and sociocultural landscape at that time, there is something both tender and awful about the reality Owens captured. It is a reality we[…..]

Context Is Everything: Visiting di Rosa

Viola Frey. Studio View— One Man Splitting, 1983; alkyd oil on canvas; 72 x 96 in. Courtesy of di Rosa collection, Napa.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt from author Maria Porges’ essay on the di Rosa in Napa, California. Porges explains: “Other museums may bear the name of a founder, but as far as I know, there really is no place quite like this one—historic home museum, contemporary white-walled space, and sculpture park rolled into one.” This article was originally published on December 4, 2014.[…..]