Posts Tagged ‘Mexico’

Edgardo Aragón: Mesoamerica – The Hurricane Effect at Jeu de Paume

Edgardo Aragón. Mesoamerica: The Hurricane Effect, 2015 (detail of map); HD video, color, sound; 16'20'' and 10 maps. Coproduction: Jeu de Paume, Paris, Fondation des Arts Graphiques et Plastiques and CAPC Musée d'Art Contemporain de Bordeaux. Courtesy of the Artist and Jeu de Paume.

In 1527, Olas Magnus drew the Carta Marina, the first detailed account of Nordic geography and the perils plaguing it by land and sea. In the image, life seems threatened mainly by ongoing human conflict and a perpetual battle with weather, but what haunted imaginations for centuries was its depiction of the monsters inhabiting the northern seas. Their presence was a documentary mix of fact[…..]

An Other Art World in Mexico

Contemporary art in Mexico operates within a very specific social and economic climate. Since 2006, Mexico has experienced ever-escalating levels of criminal and state violence. Suspicion of collusion between organized crime and the government is common. The case of the presumed torture and murder of the forty-three normalistas directly shows the extent of cooperation between criminal groups and local, regional, and federal authorities. Police officers,[…..]

Lorena Wolffer – Expuestas: Registros Públicos at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City

Antimemorias: enmiendas públicas, 2011; installation view, Lorena Wolffer Expuestas: registros públicos, 2015. Courtesy of Lorena Wolffer and Museo de Arte Moderno. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

Walking into Lorena Wolffer’s Registros Públicos at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City is a deeply unsettling experience. The space is tiny, just a few meters across, and the ceiling height is far closer to a bedroom than a gallery. Written in large red letters along the walls are a series of insults and threats from husbands and lovers to their partners–although using[…..]

From the Archives – Enrique Metinides: Chronicling Catastrophe

Mexico City, September 19, 1985 © Enrique Metindies, Courtesy 212berlin

Today from the DS archives, we bring you Allegra Kirkland’s review of Chronicling Catastrophe. Originally published on February 26, 2013, this article is a consideration of Enrique Metinides‘ fifty-year-long career in chronicling disasters that are, in Kirkland’s words, “anonymous crime [scenes] and hauntingly specific [tragedies].” Unfortunately, these images, and ones like them, are ever-relevant in our violent, modern world. The journalistic expression “If it bleeds, it leads” is particularly[…..]

Mexico as Muse

Robert Motherwell. Pancho Villa, Dead and Alive, 1943; cut-and-pasted printed and painted papers, wood veneer, gouache, oil, and ink on board; 28 1/4 x 35 7/8 in.

As part of our ongoing relationship with the Los Angeles-based Artillery, today we bring you an article about artists who have been inspired by the landscape and culture of Mexico. The author, Betty Ann Brown, says, “My journey through Mexico has been a journey from consumption to critical thinking.” Mexico as Muse was originally published on April 30, 2013. “Mexico is truly the promised land for abstract[…..]

Macho Boogie-Woogie in Mexico

Adrian S. Bara sculpture installation, Cafe Benito, 2012

It’s a rainy summer night in Guadalajara. Zooming through the dark, the jeep I’m riding in feels more like a powerboat as it leaves a black wake in the flooded streets. This ain’t no British rain – and thank God for that. (I’ve had enough drizzle for two lifetimes.) Palm fronds shake and the heavy rain suddenly turns to hail. The frothy water in the[…..]

Disponible at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The idea is of an artist being a/n (insert nationality here) artist is becoming a thing of the past. This isn’t politically correct posturing, it’s reality now that the smartest artists today work locally and show globally. Conceptually it’s not a viable option to sit still in one environment understanding only what you consider native, and economically it’s not possible for a single city to[…..]