Posts Tagged ‘MoMA’

#Hashtags: Critiquing Museums from the Outside In

The Broad_exterior rendering

#museums #architecture #philanthropy #urban development #institutional critique #spectacle #metaphor In January, the Los Angeles 2020 Commission, a group of thirteen experts convened by the Los Angeles City Council to assess the city’s civic problems, delivered a damning report. Titled “A Time for Truth,” it begins with the statement “Los Angeles is barely treading water while the rest of the world is moving forward,” and gets[.....]

#Hashtags: Mimics and Minstrels

#access #discrimination #appropriation #institutions #representation #re-performance Two important events transpired in the art world last week that have brought the complications of diversity and hierarchy into sharp focus. The first is the passing of artist Elaine Sturtevant, an artist who sublimated a critique of gendered inequity among artist peers into works that appropriated and re-created works deemed significant to the canon of contemporary art. The other[.....]

Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938 at MoMA

René Magritte. La clef des songes (The Interpretation of Dreams), 1935; Oil on canvas, 16 1/8 x 10 5/8 in. © Charly Herscovici. Photo: Jerry Thompson

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, pays homage to the quintessentially Surrealist decade in the career of Belgian painter Rene Magritte with Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-38. Surrealism flourished as the preeminent art movement between World Wars I and II in Europe. The MoMA exhibition, traveling to Houston and Chicago in 2014, showcases Magritte’s prolific Brussels and Paris years and proves the[.....]

Visionary Surreal: The Quay Brothers’ Street of Crocodiles

Quay Brothers, "Street of Crocodiles".

In restless anticipation of the MoMA show Quay Brothers: On Deciphering the Pharmacist’s Prescription for Lip-Reading Puppets  (opened just last weekend on August 12), I have been re-visiting the depths of the Quays’ body of work. The show—billed as “the first presentation of the Quay Brothers’ work in all their fields of creative activity”—promises a comprehensive, considered overview of this inimitable duo’s eclectic œuvre, which encompasses[.....]

Feng Mengbo

Today’s article is from our friends at Art Practical, where Matthew Harrison Tedford discusses the installation The Long March: Restart by artist Feng Mengbo currently on view at MoMA PS1. Feng Mengbo at MoMA PS1 demands that viewers participate in the work’s unraveling. The Long March: Restart (2008), the installation coterminous with the eponymous exhibition, is a video game. The exhibition marks the first time[.....]

The Intersections Between Photography and Sculpture

Today’s post comes from our friends over at Flavorwire.com, a site dedicated to breaking exciting news in everything contemporary, including visual art. In the spirit of our ongoing content sharing partnership, we bring you an article on The Intersections Between Photography and Sculpture, a new exhibition currently on view at the MoMA in New York City. This article was originally published Tuesday Sep 7, 2010[.....]

@ MoMA

Days ago, the Museum of Modern Art‘s Department of Architecture and Design announced their acquisition of a new work into the collection. The piece is one that we of the age of email and Twitter know well—the @ symbol. Since the announcement, the Internet has been abuzz with the news, mostly because its implications reach far beyond the art and design world. It’s so familiar[.....]