Posts Tagged ‘Museum of Contemporary Art’

Summer Session – Denise Gray: MOCA Education Department

Image courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Photo: Sean MacGillivray.

For this Summer Session we’re going Back to School, and today we bring you Sasha Lee’s interview with Denise Gray of the MOCA Education Department. Here Gray talks about her work as an educator and her role in MOCA’s apprenticeship program, which is designed to encourage high-school students to engage with the local art community by attending talks, visiting exhibitions, and curating their own events. This interview[…..]

Yarn Trails: Visual Resonance Among Three Exhibitions in Chicago

Detail of Academic Connections: Media Atlas, 2014, an undertaking of Professor W.J.T. Mitchell’s Theories of Media class students, in a gallery at the Smart Museum of the University of Chicago. Photo: Saul Rosenfield.

The typical museum experience is controlled. A pathway describes a route from one artwork to another, each illustrated by its label and narrated by an audio tour. However, three exhibitions currently on view in Chicago invite the visitor to engage in a less predictable process. At the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art, visual-culture scholar W.J.T. Mitchell and the students of his “Theories of[…..]

Girls Will be Girls, or Will They?

L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast A weekly column by Catherine Wagley In 2002, feminist matriarch Judy Chicago co-curated an all-women art exhibition in China, in a place called Lugu Lake, historically a matriarchal society. At the last minute, just before the show’s opening, another curator, a man, arrived with a piece his wife had made. “You know, if I didn’t know better, I’d[…..]

Adam Ekberg

In it’s final week at  Thomas Robertello Gallery is an exhibition of new photographs and video by Chicago-based artist Adam Ekberg.  Continuing with the use of lens-based phenomena, humble celebratory gestures, and primitive constructs, Ekberg further develops two distinct bodies of work; images created in the woods or nature, and images using his apartment as stage set. While similar to the performative aspects of Ekberg’s[…..]