Posts Tagged ‘nature’

Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest at the New Museum

Pipilotti Rist. Mercy Garden, 2014; two-channel video and sound installation, color, with carpet; 10:30 min; dimensions variable. Sound by Heinz Rohrer. Courtesy of the Artist, Hauser & Wirth, Luhring Augustine, and New Museum. Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio.

I admit that I’m late to discovering Swiss artist Pipilotti Rist. However, given that she has been producing work since the 1980s, and only in 2016 has received her first major retrospective in New York, Pixel Forest at the New Museum, I may not be the only one. The exhibition as a whole is an immersive environment, where one can easily and pleasurably lose time—an[…..]

Fan Mail: Meeson Pae Yang

Meeson Pae Yang. Index, 2005–06; steel, glass, fluorescent lights, Plexiglas, sucrose solution, vinyl tubing, electrical components, vacuum-sealed packaging, latex, silicone, silicone tubing, polyurethane, trimmer line, nylon fittings; 78 x 114 x 36 in. Courtesy of El Camino College, Torrance, CA and the Artist.

Science and art have a variably rocky relationship in contemporary culture; it is not unusual to encounter people who believe these fields to be opposites on the spectrum of human inquiry. But Meeson Pae Yang’s body of work rejects such binary thinking. Her practice utilizes the affective and technical qualities of the natural sciences to create large works and immersive environments that direct viewers’ gazes[…..]

Fan Mail: Alexander Heffesse

Alexander Heffesse. Sanitary Wipe (Large), 2016; solid surface, epoxy, paper towel, nylon strap, stand; 12 x 5 x 11 in. Photo by Adele Schelling.

With a background in architecture, it’s no surprise that Brooklyn-based artist Alexander Heffesse works so well with space. Heffesse engages with installation as a construction site, his point of departure being the idea of the construction worker as an artisan figure engaged in the act of creating. Noticing the proliferation of empty Gatorade bottles at construction sites, Heffesse drew a connection between social economics and[…..]

Salt/Water at the Photographic Center Northwest

Daniel Hawkins. Union Bay #5, 2013; C-print; 8 x 10 inches. Courtesy of the Artist.

Salt and water: an amalgamation of fundamental, life-sustaining compounds that evokes the sea, sweaty human excretions, and the makings of primordial soup. Independently innocuous, it is the combination of salt and water that produces something transformative—a substance potentially electric and corrosive. It is the coming together of salt and water that sparked the concept for Salt/Water, an exhibition of contemporary photography on view at the[…..]

Gilberto Esparza: Cultivos at Laboratorio Arte Alameda

Gilberto Esparza. Plantas autofotosintéticas, 2013-2014; polycarbonate, carbon fiber, stainless steel, silicone, acrylic, electronic circuits, waste water and aquatic ecosystem. Courtesy of Laboratorio Arte Alameda.

Sheltered by darkness, a mysterious octopus-like artifact lies in the nave of the Laboratorio Arte Alameda, a contemporary art museum housed in what was once an ancient convent. Capable of creating light and life by itself, the machine artifact operates by complex mechanisms. Twelve cylinders containing microbial fuel cells are connected to a main Plexiglas tank that houses plants in its interior. Every cylinder carries wastewater from various[…..]

Scott Greene: Deep State at Catharine Clark Gallery

Scott Greene. Trinitas, 2015; oil on canvas on panel, 50 x 40 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Catharine Clark Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Erica Truong reviews Scott Greene: Deep State at Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco. In his fourth solo exhibition with Catharine Clark Gallery, Scott Greene presents a[…..]

Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

Invariant Interval, 2013; installation view, Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature, 2015. Courtesy of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, SC. Photo: Rick Rhodes.

The desire to create forms via chance and natural phenomena is reflected in the works in Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature at Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. Despite a disparate range of formats, including porcelain sculpture, complex wire installations, and color aquatints, this exhibition brings together a wide array of works that originate from a process-based practice and share connections to[…..]