Posts Tagged ‘New Museum’

Ragnar Kjartansson: Me, My Mother, My Father, and I at the New Museum

Ragnar Kjartansson. Take Me Here by the Dishwasher (Memorial for a Marraige), 2011. Installation view, Ragnar Kjartansson: Me, My Mother, My Father, and I, 2014. Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Ragnar Kjartansson’s Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage, a mixture of live performance and film, transforms the New Museum’s fourth floor into something like a college movie night sent adrift. The darkened gallery, one wall of which serves as projector screen, becomes a makeshift den—modestly furnished but amply stocked with beer—for ten shaggy troubadours with acoustic guitars. Their ambling, unbroken melody[.....]

Chris Burden: Extreme Measures at the New Museum

Chris Burden. Documentation of Selected Works 1971-1974 (film still), 1971-75. SD Video, color and black and white, sound. 34:38 min. Courtesy of The New Museum.

Chris Burden is one of the legendary giants of performance art. In his seminal body pieces from the early 1970s, he orchestrated a series of daredevil brutalities and tests of the body’s resilience. Burden has had a more prolonged career, however, as a large-scale installation artist who masterminds feats of engineering that seem divorced from the body: scaled-down replicas of major bridges, a giant scale[.....]

The Dark Side of Mickey Mouse: Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum

Llyn Foulkes. Pop, 1985-90; mixed media with soundtrack; 84 x 123 x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist's website.

Llyn Foulkes ranks among that rare cadre of artists for whom fame is an optional extra. Over the course of his fifty-year career, the Los Angeles–based multimedia artist and musician has experienced periods of success—for his monumental Pop-influenced paintings of rocks and, decades later, for his zany, large-scale narrative tableaux. But much of his work has been met with silence from critics and buyers, allowing[.....]

“NOW! THAT’S WHAT I CALL ART”: NYC 1993 at the New Museum

Pepon Osorio, "The Scene of the Crime (Whose Crime?)," [Detail] 1993. Mixed medium installation.

NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star is the New Museum’s crash course in the recent history of contemporary art in New York. The exhibition positions 1993 as a signifier for mass cultural change: the thesis being that the events of this year irrevocably directed culture towards its manifestation in 2013. NYC 1993 seems just as concerned, however, with the ways that we[.....]

Springing Up at the New Museum: Phyllida Barlow, Tacita Dean & Nathalie Djurberg

Leaving the crowds behind after the frenzied week of Frieze, I headed down to the New Museum after waiting for a month in anticipation to see some of my favorite artists show under one roof. Though there are numerous shows currently at the New Museum, I was there to see Phyllida Barlow, Tacita Dean and Nathalie Djurberg, all artists with whom I have had minimal[.....]

Get Your Ass To Mars: Takeshi Murata at Ratio 3

The title for Takeshi Murata’s current show—Get Your Ass To Mars—is a command, stolen from Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Hauser/Quaid character in Total Recall, based on Philip K. Dick’s “We Can Remember It For You Wholesale.” For the Hauser/Quaid character, what awaits him on Mars is textbook Dick: a conspiracy based on money and greed; instability in memory and identity, or in discerning reality; plus our own[.....]

Knots Landing: Lynda Benglis at the New Museum

More Failure More!!! -This week’s series on Failure falls in line with our previous rounds on Myth, Utopia and Rebellion. Stay tuned as we attempt to succeed this week with 6 more articles on Failure… FORCE OF FAILURE: DailyServing’s latest week-long series Lynda Benglis is a fearless artist. She added a much-needed sense of humor to first-generation feminism and imbued late 1960s/early ‘70s Post-Minimal sculpture[.....]