Posts Tagged ‘New Orleans’

Amer Kobaslija at Arthur Roger Gallery

Amer Kobaslija. Studio with Chair and Ladder (J. Pollock, E. Hamptons), 2015; Oil on Plexiglas; 12 x 14 ¼ in.

In his 1971 essay “The Function of the Studio,” conceptual artist Daniel Buren defined the artist’s studio as a metadiscourse of “frames, envelopes, and limits” imposed upon the working artist in the age of advanced capitalism.[1] Claiming that this privileged space had become nothing more than an “ossified custom”—a “commercial depot” for curators and dealers to ship works out into the world (and thus detach[…..]

Radcliffe Bailey at Contemporary Art Center New Orleans

Radcliffe Bailey. On Your Way Up. 2013. Tarp, crocodile, and steel. 120 x 106 x 10 inches. Image: Courtesy of the Contemporary Arts Center of New Orleans.

Radcliffe Bailey’s current exhibition at Contemporary Art Center New Orleans rewards multiple visits. Comprising seven large-scale works by the Atlanta-based artist, the exhibition gathers an intensely personal constellation of imagery that has continued to distinguish Bailey as a contemporary artist of significant aesthetic and critical power. Bailey’s emphasis on the rich symbolic context of the liminal, or the in-between, provides support for his expansive definition[…..]

Jim Roche: Cultural Mechanic at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art

Installation view, Jim Roche: Cultural Mechanic, 2015. Courtesy of The Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Photo: Richard McCabe.

Jim Roche’s life is such a good yarn, there is a danger of it overshadowing his work. Before Roche was out of graduate school at the University of Dallas, he was one of the first artists ever to exhibit ceramics at the Whitney; in 1987 he was the record holder for the La Carrera Mexican 1,000cc Motorcycle Road Race; he won an NEA fellowship in[…..]

Michael Pajon: Palimpsest at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery

Michael Pajon. The Night was Clear as Her Puddled Tears. 2014. Mixed media collage on book covers. 11 x 19 inches. Image: Courtesy of the Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, 2015.

To invoke a palimpsest is to find oneself wading into an extremely fertile territory of meaning. With equal relevance to the development of mathematics, geology, architecture, and memory studies, the term has transcended its origins as a reusable writing parchment in ancient Greece to become a material metaphor for the multilayered history of a particular place, epoch, or individual subject. Despite the term’s dynamic etymological[…..]

Totems Not Taboo at Newcomb Gallery

Hew Locke. Installation View of The Nameless, 2010-2014; at Newcomb Art Gallery for Prospect.3: Notes for Now, a Project of Prospect New Orleans, October 25, 2014 - January 25, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Hales Gallery, London, Photo © Scott McCrossen/ FIVE65 Design

January 6 was the official start of the Carnival season in New Orleans. Totems Not Taboo, an exhibit at Newcomb Art Gallery as part of Prospect.3: Notes for Now, is an ode to Jermayne MacAgy’s 1959 exhibit of the same name at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. MacAgy assembled one of the largest exhibitions of primitive art and displayed them as objects of fine[…..]

José Antonio Vega Macotela at Prospect.3

Jose Antonio Vega Macotela. Time Exchange 291 (From Time Divisa), 2009; intervened book; 8.27 x 6.3 x 4.72 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Prospect.3

“My eternity has died and I am waking it.” –Violence of the Hours, Cesar Vallejo It sounds like a riddle: No one can buy more of it, and few have enough of it; it wears on the rich and poor equally; loss of it produces deep fear. Time’s ability to be transferred and manipulated is at the heart of José Antonio Vega Macotela’s mixed-media series[…..]

Prospect.3 New Orleans

Camille Henrot. Grosse Fatigue, 2013 (film still). Video installation (color, sound) Courtesy of the artist, Silex Films and kamel mennour, Paris.

Honoré de Balzac wrote: “Ideas are a complete system within us, resembling a natural kingdom, a sort of flora, of which the iconography will one day be outlined by some man who will perhaps be accounted a madman.” This passage was included in Camille Henrot’s writings about her video Grosse Fatigue (2014), now on view in Prospect.3, a sprawling biennial in both geographic and thematic[…..]