Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Carrie Mae Weems. Guggenheim Bilbao, 2006; Digital Chromogenic Print; 72 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

Currently at the small Studio Museum in Harlem, visitors will find several black-and-white photographs by Carrie Mae Weems, each of which captures the artist dressed in a simple, long black dress. Her pose—tall and regal, with strong shoulders and a long, straight spine—rhythmically repeats itself throughout the gallery. These photographs depict Weems standing outside some of art’s most celebrated institutions, including the Louvre, the Tate[.....]

Borna Sammak: All Dogs Are Pets at JTT

Borna Sammak. All Dogs Are Pets, 2014; installation view, JTT, New York. Courtesy of the artist and JTT.

All Dogs Are Pets, Borna Sammak’s current solo exhibition at JTT, presents sculpture, painting, and video full of glowing references to 1990s American suburbia. Trafficking in the humorous young boys’ fare of canceled Nickelodeon cartoons, Sammak’s pieces are composed of sometimes repurposed, sometimes refabricated objects you might find at a Wal-Mart or strip-mall store. His work draws from the cultural garbage can, creating an aesthetic[.....]

Yee I-Lann: Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art

Yee I-Lann. Picturing Power: Wherein one nods with political sympathy and says I understand you better than you understand yourself, I’m just here to help you help yourself, 2013; Giclée print on Hahnemüle Photo Rag Ultra Smooth Fine Art, 310 gsm 100% cotton rag paper, 25 x 25 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Tyler Rollins Fine Art.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art in New York City Yee I-Lann’s solo exhibition Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York, is[.....]

Trevor Shimizu: Again at 47 Canal and Rachel Mason: Starseeds at envoy enterprises

Rachel Mason. Yayoi Kusama, 2014; mixed media, dimensions varied. Courtesy of the artist and envoy enterprises.

Again, now at 47 Canal, presents a new set of paintings by Trevor Shimizu featuring more of the artist’s characteristically banal domestic caricatures. Of these, Shimizu’s sex paintings are his best. Featuring sketches of video monitors displaying stick figures engaged in BDSM porn, a vaginal close-up nestled next to a box of tissues, or a pop-up ad for penis enhancement, the paintings read as swiftly[.....]

Doug Wheeler at David Zwirner Gallery

A viewer in Wheeler's "rotational horizon work"

Not long after disassembling Yayoi Kusama’s infinity rooms, which had New Yorkers queuing up in polar conditions from the beginning to the end of their six-week run, David Zwirner Gallery now offers another buzzworthy, limited-capacity affair: a “rotational horizon work” by light-and-space artist Doug Wheeler. The wise will consider making a reservation in advance this time. Housed in the commodious ground floor of the gallery’s 20th Street[.....]

Michelle Segre: Symptoms of Escape Velocity at Derek Eller Gallery

Michelle Segre. Spaghetti Love, 2014; mixed media on paper; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, New York.

The constructions of Israeli-born artist Michelle Segre—towering webs of yarn, wire, and organic matter—resemble dispatches from another planet or totems of some long-lost civilization. Unfinished and roughly made, her work still evidences painstaking attention to detail, a ritualistic practice in which all the constituent elements impart shrouded, mystical meaning. A small show of her most recent work, currently on view at Derek Eller Gallery, expands[.....]

David Altmejd: Juices at Andrea Rosen Gallery

David Altmejd. The Flux and the Puddle, 2014; Plexiglas, quartz, polystyrene, expandable foam, epoxy clay, epoxy gel, resin, synthetic hair, clothing, leather shoes, thread, mirror, plaster, acrylic paint, latex paint, metal wire, glass eyes, sequin, ceramic, synthetic flowers, synthetic branches, glue, gold, feathers, steel, coconuts, aqua resin, burlap, lighting system including fluorescent lights, Sharpie ink, wood; 129 x 252 x 281 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Andrea Rosen Gallery.

In the main space of Andrea Rosen Gallery, David Altmejd’s gridded plastic network The Flux and the Puddle forms a labyrinthine rectangle—a wrinkle in time. In an homage to science and metaphysics, behind a network of clear vitrines, a series of human-animal hybrids construct themselves out of resin, epoxy, and clay, morphing in and out of candied fruits as harbingers of a kind of alternate evolutionary[.....]