Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

A Perfect Storm

Rokni Haerizadeh. But a Storm is Blowing from Paradise. Photo: Ramin Haerizadeh. (© the artist; courtesy the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum)

From our friends at REORIENT, today we bring you author Nur Shkembi’s thoughts on subversive practices in the Guggenheim’s exhibition of Contemporary Middle Eastern and North African Art, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Shkembi states, “This notion of art as a subversive practice is not new; however, redefining the material itself as the place from which ideas are ‘smuggled in’ is certainly compelling.” But a Storm Is Blowing[…..]

Summer Session – Clint Mario and ME, @me_newyork

Clint Mario and ME, @me_newyork

It’s the last day of July—and with it, our final look at the theme of celebrity! We examined the complex intersections of fame, money, desire, and artistic practice this past month, and for our final installment we bring you an ongoing project in New York City by pseudonymic street artists Clint Mario and ME, whose self-reflexive ad takeovers speak to the inherent absurdity of celebrity’s constant jockeying for cultural ubiquity. Tomorrow[…..]

Summer Session – Jeff Koons: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Jeff Koons, Michael Jackson and Bubbles, 1988. Porcelain; 42 x 70 1⁄2 x 32 1⁄2 in. (106.7 x 179.1 x 82.6 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

For this month’s Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, and what better contemporary artist to embody this topic than Jeff Koons, for whom celebrity and consumerism are the hallmarks of his most famous pieces? Today we bring you Alex Bigman’s review of the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum, which ran June 27–October 19, 2014. Despite Koons’ infamous reputation for banality, Bigman reminds us[…..]

From Minimalism into Algorithm at the Kitchen

From Minimalism into Algorithm, Phase 2; 2016; installation view, The Kitchen. Featuring works by John McCracken, Zoe Leonard, Andrea Crespo, and Cheyney Thompson. Courtesy of The Kitchen. Photo: Jason Mandella.

In a 1966 review, Rosalind Krauss described how one of Donald Judd’s “progression” wall reliefs pulled the rug from under her. Its intervallic sequence of supporting members suggested a Renaissance colonnade, but its variable spacing negated the compositional and spatial logic that this model prepared her to expect. “The work itself exploits and at the same time confounds previous knowledge to project its own meaning,”[…..]

Setting Out at Apexart

William Lamson. A Line Describing the Sun, 2010 (video still); 2-channel video; 13:35. Courtesy of the Artist and apexart, New York.

In Setting Out (an exhibition selected as part of apexart’s Unsolicited Proposal Program), the guest curators Shona Kitchen, Aly Ogasian, and Jennifer Dalton Vincent showcase works that reframe or enact the vocabularies, tools, and approaches of explorers and scientists. With many intriguing works on display, the most interesting render the Earth strange by observing it with fresh eyes, analogous to the wonder of seeing distant[…..]

Marina Rosenfeld and Ben Vida at Fridman Gallery

Marina Rosenfeld and Ben Vida. New Ear Festival, 2016 (performance still); sound performance. Courtesy of Fridman Gallery.

It is a strange thing to sit in a room for an hour and experience two people producing something unrecognizable. When successful, the relationship between the audience and the performers depends on generosity and trust. We, the audience, trust that we will be entertained, and so we open ourselves to the possibilities of the experience. In exchange for our receptivity, they, the performers, abandon certainty[…..]

Art Brut in America: The Incursion of Jean Dubuffet at the American Folk Art Museum

Augustin Lesage. Composition Symbolique, Amour pour l’Humanité (Symbolic Composition, Love for Humanity), 1932;
oil on canvas; 38-1/4 x 27-1/2 in.; Pas-de-Calais, France.
 Collection de l’Art Brut, Lausanne, Switzerland. Photo: Claude Bornand.

Art Brut in America: The Incursion of Jean Dubuffet, currently on view at the American Folk Art Museum in New York, focuses on two events seminal to the introduction of art brut to an American audience. The first was a 1951 speech given by the French artist Jean Dubuffet to the Arts Club of Chicago entitled “Anticultural Positions.” Displayed in full at the museum, the[…..]