Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Tseng Kwong Chi at Grey Art Gallery

Tseng Kwong Chi. New York, New York (World Trade Center), 1979, from the East Meets West series; Gelatin silver print, printed 2014; 36 x 36 in. Courtesy of Muna Tseng Dance Projects, Inc., New York

Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera is the first major retrospective on the artist, co-organized by the Chrysler Gallery and NYU’s Grey Art Gallery. Bringing Tseng’s body of work to the fore is an important and overdue project; his career was regularly eclipsed by his friends, whose trajectories characterized the 1980s New York City art market boom, most notably Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.[…..]

Marte Eknæs and Sean Raspet: Calculus of Negligence at Room East

Sean Raspet. Layer Adjustment (Accident Probability Adjustment), 2015; alterations made to the physical location to increase the probability of an accident while remaining within the scope of existing insurance coverage (May 5–June 21, 2105). Image courtesy of Room East.

True catastrophes cannot be foreseen… True catastrophes are new information. They are, by definition, surprising adventures.—Vilém Flusser, Into the Universe of Technical Images, 1985 With the exception of a small community of daredevils, most people try to avoid disasters. There are, of course, various degrees of risk associated with everything we do that drive our precautions as well as the insurance industry. In general, the[…..]

Beverly Buchanan: And You May Find Yourself… at Andrew Edlin Gallery

Beverly Buchanan. Old Colored School, 2010; wood and paint; 20.25 x 14.75 x 18.5 in (51.4 x 37.5 x 47 cm). Courtesy Andrew Edlin Gallery.

Though certainly no stranger to the art world, Beverly Buchanan has followed an unusual trajectory in her career and public profile as an artist. Born in 1940 in North Carolina, and raised in South Carolina, she spent much of her childhood accompanying her father, an agricultural scientist, while he visited sharecroppers in far-flung locations throughout the rural South, observing the lives and structures they made[…..]

On Kawara: Silence at the Guggenheim Museum

On Kawara. DEC. 29, 1977 (Thursday, New York), 1977, from Today series, 1966–2013; acrylic on canvas; 8 x 10 in; shown with artist-made cardboard storage box, 10-1/2 x 10-3/4 x 2 in. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner, New York/London and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.

The first retrospective since On Kawara’s death in July 2014, On Kawara—Silence at the Guggenheim Museum presents fifty years of the artist’s work. At the core of the exhibition are the daily practices that constituted Kawara’s life and art: the conceptual rituals that produced the Today, I Got Up, I Met, I Went, and I Am Still Alive series. Each series represents a different way[…..]

Hayv Kahraman: How Iraqi Are You? at Jack Shainman

Hayv Kahraman. Barboog, 2014; oil on linen; 108 x 72 in.©Hayv Kahraman. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Hayv Kahraman’s current solo exhibition at Jack Shainman, How Iraqi Are You?, is captivating. A suite of large paintings, produced in 2014 and 2015, show pairs and groups of women in patterned garments interacting with each other in minimal settings. Context is provided by simple architectural forms, and by Arabic script that appears under or alongside the figures. Text from the gallery explains that the works[…..]

Anicka Yi: You Can Call Me F at The Kitchen

Anicka Yi. Installation view of You Can Call Me F at The Kithcen in New York City , 2015.

At the entrance to the black box of the Kitchen’s upstairs gallery, a long vitrine houses an illuminated culture of bacteria on agar jelly. The cracked slab teems with biological entities colored like bruises on sallow skin. Imprinted with capital letters, it reads: YOU CAN CALL ME F. Anicka Yi’s current solo show stages part breeding ground, part containment camp for “F”—the feminine, the woman[…..]

From the Archives – Andrew Moore: Dirt Meridian at Yancey Richardson Gallery

Andrew Moore. First Light, Cherry County, Nebraska, 2013. Courtesy of Andrew Moore & Yancey Richardson

With the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s recent announcement that California’s Central Valley farmers will not receive any contracted federal water for the second year in a row, the photographic work of Andrew Moore is a bleak reminder of the state’s ongoing water crisis.  Author Nandita Raghuram describes the artist’s aerial photographs of the 100th meridian as “sweeping views of windswept houses, splintered earth, and prairie grass[…..]