Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Outsider Art Fair 2015

Edward Deeds. Untitled, 1936–66; installed at Hirschl and Adler Modern, Outsider Art Fair 2015. Photo: Lia Wilson.

The 2015 Outsider Art Fair, held at Center 548 in the Chelsea gallery district of New York City, marked the twenty-third iteration of the event. It also occurred within a season of mainstream museums prominently featuring the work of so-called outsider artists in very high-profile, insider art spaces. Judith Scott: Bound and Unbound, the artist’s first retrospective, was held at the Brooklyn Museum in the[…..]

Tomi Ungerer: All in One at the Drawing Center

2.	Tomi Ungerer. Untitled (drawing for The Party), 1966; ink and ink wash on paper;
18 x 18 in. Courtesy of the Collection Musée Tomi Ungerer – Centre
international de l’Illustration, Strasbourg. Photo: Musées de la Ville de Strasbourg/Mathieu Bertola.

Tomi Ungerer: All in One, now on view at the Drawing Center, is a joyful retrospective of the artist’s career as children’s-book author, satirical cartoonist, political illustrator, and erotic artist. Sadly it’s also incredibly timely. Because though Ungerer was a beloved illustrator, he was also rejected for the explicit imagery in his political and erotic work. As we engage in a global conversation about shock[…..]

Amanda Turner Pohan: The Signals Are Caressing Us at A.I.R. Gallery

2.	Amanda Turner Pohan. The Signals Are Caressing Us, 2015; installation view, A.I.R. Gallery, Brooklyn. Courtesy of A.I.R. Gallery.

In the back room of A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, a scent dispenser exhales once an hour. A meandering plastic tube connects the dispenser to a six-and-a-half-gallon jug on the floor near the center of the room. The jug contains the concentrated form of a custom-formulated perfume derived from sensors that measured the carbon dioxide exhaled by the artist Amanda Turner Pohan during thirteen unique orgasms.[…..]

From the Archives – Interview with Johan Grimonprez

Johan Grimonprez, still/installation view of Double Take at Sean Kelley Gallery (2009).

Opening today at the SVA Chelsea Gallery, It’s a Poor Sort of Memory That Only Works Backwards is a solo exhibition of four films by Johan Grimonprez. To accompany the beginning of this exhibition, today we bring you an interview with the artist from 2011, when he memorably said, “… every kiss is a political act.” This article was originally published on March 23, 2011. Johan[…..]

The Self-Portraits of Samuel Fosso

The artist as Angela Davis from African Spirits, 2008
© Samuel Fosso. Courtesy The Walther Collection and Jean Marc Patras / Galerie

From our friends at Guernica, today we bring you a feature on the self-portraits of artist Samuel Fosso. Author Emmanuel Iduma notes, “The self-portraits are intimate for what they allow to be imagined… [T]hese representations of our favorite black heroes ask viewers to think about the use of public images, and how they become objects of worship, and of control.” This article was originally published on November 17,[…..]

Moving Walls 22 / Watching You, Watching Me at Open Society Foundations-New York

Mishka Henner. Dutch Landscapes, 2011;
Archival pigment print.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Mary Coyne reviews Watching You, Watching Me at Open Society Foundations in New York City. Edward Snowden’s revelatory findings of pervasive surveillance by the NSA fundamentally changed[…..]

From the Archives – Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties at the Brooklyn Museum

David Hammons. The Door, 1969; wood, acrylic sheet, and pigment construction, 79 x 48 x 15 in. Courtesy of Collection of Friends, the Foundation of the California African American Museum, Los Angeles.

Today from our archives, we bring you Lia Wilson’s review of a recent exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. Wilson explains the importance of this exhibition: “Witness does the essential and painful work of revealing how an inadequate visual cultural record can come to mirror inadequate social reform. There can be no greater demonstration of the need for a more diverse and inclusive art-historical canon and[…..]