Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Chris Ofili: Night and Day at the New Museum

Chris Ofili. The Adoration of Captain Shit and the Legend of the Black Stars (Third Version), 1998; oil, acrylic, polyester resin, paper collage, glitter, map pins, and elephant dung on linen; 96 x 72 in. Courtesy of the Artist; David Zwirner, New York/London; and Victoria Miro, London.

Night and Day at the New Museum is the first retrospective of the artist Chris Ofili in the United States. While the show incorporates sculptures and drawings, it unmistakably showcases the artist’s bravery, skill, and reinvention in painting over the past thirty years. The six bodies of work that span three floors are fearlessly distinct; clearly this is an artist who has no interest in[…..]

The Heart Is Not a Metaphor: Robert Gober at MoMA

Robert Gober. Installation view of Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar. Courtesy of the artist and The Museum of Modern Art.

The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, the first large-scale survey of Robert Gober’s career to take place in the United States, is a testament to the breadth of the artist’s provocative articulation of those moments of cultural past that linger in the corners of peripheral vision—a lingering that keeps one unsettled. Queered, uncanny objects of the everyday radiate the trauma of the half-remembered event. In Gober’s untitled piece from 1997,[…..]

Anton Perich: Electric Paintings 1978-2014 at Postmasters Gallery

Anton Perich. American Altarpiece, 2004. Acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery, New York

“No, Wade Guyton did not invent a new paintbrush; Anton Perich did in 1978, when Guyton was six.” Thus combatively begins the press release for Anton Perich: Electric Paintings 1978–2014 at Postmasters Gallery. The un-cited author of the claim that “Wade Guyton invented a new paintbrush” is Jerry Saltz, writing on Guyton’s 2012 survey at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Of course, Saltz was[…..]

Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution at the China Institute

“Double Happiness” tray with design of mango, 1969; industrial enamel; 31 cm in diameter. Courtesy of the Artist and the China Institute.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Adam Monohon reviews Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution at the China Institute in New York City. Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution, the[…..]

Zero: Countdown to Tomorrow at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Illustration from ZERO 3, July 1961, design by Heinz Mack. Courtesy Heinz Mack.

In Düsseldorf, West Germany, amid the tumultuous aftermath of the Second World War, two German artists—Heinz Mack and Otto Piene—founded Group Zero in 1957. Later joined by fellow German artist Günther Uecker in 1961, the three sought to reinvent art in the postwar era and create a vision toward a transformed future through myriad artistic forms: performance, painting, sculpture, exhibition, publication, film, and installation. In[…..]

Do Ho Suh: Rubbing/Loving at Lehmann Maupin

Do Ho Suh. Rubbing/Loving Project, 348 West 22nd Street, Apt. A, New York, NY 10011, 2013-14; installation view, Drawings, 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong. Photo: Elisabeth Bernstein.

Do Ho Suh’s Rubbing/Loving Project: 348 West 22nd Street, Apt. A, New York NY 10011, is a personal project of love and memory, but in the end it denies the viewer the access to the artist’s interiority that it seems to promise. Currently on display at the Chelsea outpost of Lehmann Maupin, the work records the artist’s former New York apartment through a series of painstakingly[…..]

From the Archives – Taner Ceylan: Lost Paintings at Paul Kasmin Gallery

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Today we look back to exactly where we were a year ago: contemplating the work of Turkish painter Taner Ceylan. Although author Alex Bigman likens many of the works to high-gloss fashion spreads, he notes: “A touch of vulgarity remains, and it’s hard to imagine these works having much political charge without it.” This article was originally published on October 16, 2013. Taner Ceylan’s Lost[…..]