Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

From the Archives – Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties at the Brooklyn Museum

David Hammons. The Door, 1969; wood, acrylic sheet, and pigment construction, 79 x 48 x 15 in. Courtesy of Collection of Friends, the Foundation of the California African American Museum, Los Angeles.

Today from our archives, we bring you Lia Wilson’s review of a recent exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. Wilson explains the importance of this exhibition: “Witness does the essential and painful work of revealing how an inadequate visual cultural record can come to mirror inadequate social reform. There can be no greater demonstration of the need for a more diverse and inclusive art-historical canon and[…..]

Ayana V. Jackson: Archival Impulse at 33 Orchard

Ayana V. Jackson. Prototype/ Phenotype, 2013; archival pigment print; edition of 6 and 3 artist proofs; 39.4 x 45.5 in.

Ayana V. Jackson’s exhibition An Archival Impulse claims to take inspiration from Hal Foster’s idea that, through confronting the archive, new systems of knowledge can be created. Jackson’s artistic interrogation targets representations of non-European bodies during the 19th and 20th centuries, a period of significant colonial expansion in Africa and the Americas. This history of representation comprises a vast field of imagery and thousands of[…..]

Chris Ofili: Night and Day at the New Museum

Chris Ofili. The Adoration of Captain Shit and the Legend of the Black Stars (Third Version), 1998; oil, acrylic, polyester resin, paper collage, glitter, map pins, and elephant dung on linen; 96 x 72 in. Courtesy of the Artist; David Zwirner, New York/London; and Victoria Miro, London.

Night and Day at the New Museum is the first retrospective of the artist Chris Ofili in the United States. While the show incorporates sculptures and drawings, it unmistakably showcases the artist’s bravery, skill, and reinvention in painting over the past thirty years. The six bodies of work that span three floors are fearlessly distinct; clearly this is an artist who has no interest in[…..]

The Heart Is Not a Metaphor: Robert Gober at MoMA

Robert Gober. Installation view of Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar. Courtesy of the artist and The Museum of Modern Art.

The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, the first large-scale survey of Robert Gober’s career to take place in the United States, is a testament to the breadth of the artist’s provocative articulation of those moments of cultural past that linger in the corners of peripheral vision—a lingering that keeps one unsettled. Queered, uncanny objects of the everyday radiate the trauma of the half-remembered event. In Gober’s untitled piece from 1997,[…..]

Anton Perich: Electric Paintings 1978-2014 at Postmasters Gallery

Anton Perich. American Altarpiece, 2004. Acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery, New York

“No, Wade Guyton did not invent a new paintbrush; Anton Perich did in 1978, when Guyton was six.” Thus combatively begins the press release for Anton Perich: Electric Paintings 1978–2014 at Postmasters Gallery. The un-cited author of the claim that “Wade Guyton invented a new paintbrush” is Jerry Saltz, writing on Guyton’s 2012 survey at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Of course, Saltz was[…..]

Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution at the China Institute

“Double Happiness” tray with design of mango, 1969; industrial enamel; 31 cm in diameter. Courtesy of the Artist and the China Institute.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Adam Monohon reviews Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution at the China Institute in New York City. Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution, the[…..]

Zero: Countdown to Tomorrow at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Illustration from ZERO 3, July 1961, design by Heinz Mack. Courtesy Heinz Mack.

In Düsseldorf, West Germany, amid the tumultuous aftermath of the Second World War, two German artists—Heinz Mack and Otto Piene—founded Group Zero in 1957. Later joined by fellow German artist Günther Uecker in 1961, the three sought to reinvent art in the postwar era and create a vision toward a transformed future through myriad artistic forms: performance, painting, sculpture, exhibition, publication, film, and installation. In[…..]