Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Daughter of Bad Girls at Klaus von Nichtssagend

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When asked why she had sculpted such pronounced, sugar-coated labia on A Subtlety, the mammy-sphinx recently on view at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, Kara Walker answered, “[It’s about] ownership of the voluptuousness of an ass”; “a 10-foot vagina…is not something that happens in art often enough”; and “[It was] a fuck-you, I’m gonna do that because this is what I have…there are enough phallic[.....]

Ranjani Shettar: Night Skies and Daydreams at Talwar Gallery

Ranjani Shettar. Tuntoroo, 2014; Hand‐molded wax beads, cotton thread, wooden beads and pigments; 131 x 188 x 135 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Talwar Gallery, New York and New Delhi.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Ranjani Shettar: Night Skies and Daydreams at Talwar Gallery in New York City.   Indian sculptor Ranjani Shettar’s seventh solo exhibition Night Skies and Daydreams[.....]

The St. Petersburg Paradox at Swiss Institute

The St. Petersburg Paradox, installation view, Swiss Institute. (from left to right) Sarah Ortmeyer. SANKT PETERSBURG PARADOX, 2014: marble chessboards, copper, iron, brass and aluminum chess tables, natural (ostrich, rhea, goose, chicken, mallard, quail, emu, and duck) eggs, artificial (marble obsidian, alabaster, and onyx) eggs; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Dvir Gallery, Tel Aviv. Tabor Robak. A*, 2014; 14-channel HD video; 9:46 min. Courtesy of the artist and team (gallery, inc.). John Miller. Labyrinth I, 1999; acrylic on canvas with sound component; 54 x 70 in. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. Kaspar Müller. Tropic of Cancer, 2014; laser prints on A3 paper; each 12 x 15 ½ in. Courtesy Galerie Francesca Pia, Zürich, The Green Gallery, Milwaukee, and Federico Vavassori, Milan. Cayetano Ferrer. Remnant Recomposition, 2014; carpet remnants, seam tape; 18 x 60 ft. Courtesy of the artist.

The St. Petersburg Paradox, currently on view at Swiss Institute, is a group show of refreshing intellectual rigor. The exhibition’s curatorial design is so tightly wound that it forms a kind of singular entity in which each featured artwork compels the viewer to consider the philosophy of its larger scheme: namely, the metaphysics of gambling. The title refers to a paradox of human psychology: When[.....]

Other Primary Structures at The Jewish Museum

Nubuo Sekine. Phase of Nothingness—Water, 1969/2005; steel, lacquer, water; 47 ¼ x 47 ¼ in. (diameter)  and 11 7/8 x 86 5/8 x 63 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Blum & Poe Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Vanessa Thill reviews Other Primary Structures at The Jewish Museum in New York City. In 1966, the exhibition Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors filled the[.....]

Suzanne Opton: Soldier at Sikkema Jenkins

Suzanne Opton. Soldier: Doherty- 302 days in Afghanistan, 2004. Archival Pigment Print. 41 x 52 inches. Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins

Soldier, a series of large-scale color portraits by the photographer Suzanne Opton now on view at Sikemma Jenkins, adheres to a simple framework. It features close-ups of the faces of young soldiers who recently served in Iraq or Afghanistan, all of whom assume the same position before the camera: lying prone, one cheek resting on the ground, face turned toward the camera. While this pose[.....]

Ragnar Kjartansson: Me, My Mother, My Father, and I at the New Museum

Ragnar Kjartansson. Take Me Here by the Dishwasher (Memorial for a Marraige), 2011. Installation view, Ragnar Kjartansson: Me, My Mother, My Father, and I, 2014. Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Ragnar Kjartansson’s Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage, a mixture of live performance and film, transforms the New Museum’s fourth floor into something like a college movie night sent adrift. The darkened gallery, one wall of which serves as projector screen, becomes a makeshift den—modestly furnished but amply stocked with beer—for ten shaggy troubadours with acoustic guitars. Their ambling, unbroken melody[.....]

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties at Brooklyn Museum

Sam Gilliam. Red April, 1970; acrylic on canvas, 110 x 160 in. Courtesy of the Iowa Museum of Art, Gift of the Longview Foundation.

As someone born two decades after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, I received visual access to the civil-rights era predominantly through photographic documentation. Black-and-white photos in history books, documentary films, and microfilm of front-page newspaper stories shaped my understanding of the period, suggesting a more or less linear sequence of events. Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties, now at the Brooklyn Museum,[.....]