Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Wynne Greenwood: More Heads at Soloway

Wynne Greenwood. Pink Head, 2013; ceramic and acrylic paint; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Soloway.

In the mid-2000s, Wynne Greenwood‘s video persona sparked an adolescent idolatry in me that really started everything. In Tracey + The Plastics, Greenwood’s three-person electro-pop band, she played all the characters, performing live shows in conversation with pre-recorded projections of herself. Watching Greenwood essentially talk to herself through Tracy, Nikki, and Cola, I was delivered a vision of the millennial queer future in which we[.....]

Barbad Golshiri: Curriculum Mortis at Thomas Erben Gallery

Barbad Golshiri. The Untitled Tomb, 2012; iron, soot, 53 x 24 in. Edition of 3. Photo: Andreas Vesterlund, courtesy the artist and Thomas Erben Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Barbad Golshiri’s Curriculum Mortis at Thomas Erben Gallery in New York City. The question of martyrdom pervades Barbad Golshiri’s sculptural installation of tombstones in[.....]

Taner Ceylan at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Taner Ceylan’s Lost Paintings series, marking the Turkish artist’s first New York solo exhibition since joining the roster of Paul Kasmin Gallery, makes for a suitably impressive debut. Begun in 2010, it consists of ten stunningly detailed hyperrealist paintings, each of which alludes to a particular figure from Turkish history or the canonical Western depictions thereof. Ceylan here aims to upset the attendant nationalist/Orientalist narratives[.....]

Rinko Kawauchi at Aperture Gallery

In Japanese, the word ametsuchi contains two characters, side by side. Together, they mean heaven and earth and make up the title of the oldest pangram in Japanese—a bare-bones chant that contains only six lines but, somehow, also includes every character in the Japanese syllabary. Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi borrows the title and theme of this ancient poem in her latest body of work, currently[.....]

Pattern Recognition at MoCADA

Pattern Recognition, currently on view at Brooklyn’s Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts, focuses primarily on the paradox of explaining abstract painting. Though designed as a straightforward, contemporary group show featuring new work from established artists, Pattern Recognition must be viewed within the context of a museum whose focus is on community dialogue and education. The hand of Dexter Wimberly, the independent curator behind the[.....]

Shifting Spaces: Here Is Where We Jump at El Museo de Barrio

The title of El Museo del Barrio’s biennial exhibit Here Is Where We Jump refers to one of Aesop’s Fables, “The Braggart.” In the tale, a man boasts of an extraordinary jump he once made in Rhodes. He claims witnesses will attest to the jump if the listeners ever visit his home country. Eventually, someone challenges the man to reproduce the jump, saying, “Jump here, jump now.[.....]

The Dark Side of Mickey Mouse: Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum

Llyn Foulkes. Pop, 1985-90; mixed media with soundtrack; 84 x 123 x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist's website.

Llyn Foulkes ranks among that rare cadre of artists for whom fame is an optional extra. Over the course of his fifty-year career, the Los Angeles–based multimedia artist and musician has experienced periods of success—for his monumental Pop-influenced paintings of rocks and, decades later, for his zany, large-scale narrative tableaux. But much of his work has been met with silence from critics and buyers, allowing[.....]