Posts Tagged ‘New York’

Summer Session – The Dark Side of Mickey Mouse: Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum

Llyn Foulkes. The Lost Frontier, 1997–2005; mixed media; 87 x 96 x 8 in. Courtesy of the artist and The New Museum

For this Summer Session topic of celebrity, today we bring you Allegra Kirkland’s review of the 2013 Llyn Foulkes retrospective at the New Museum. Across all of his multi- and mixed-media works, Foulkes’ oeuvre holds a special fascination for the hollow promises of fame implicit in American popular figures, like Mickey Mouse and Clark Kent. His heavily textured style viscerally manifests the darkness beneath the saccharine[…..]

From the Archives – Malick Sidibé

Malick Sidibé. Untitled, 1969/2004; silver gelatin print, hand-painted wooden frame. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

This week at Daily Serving we’re remembering the life and work of photographer Malick Sidibé (1935–2016), whose studio portraiture and candid images of nightlife in Mali during the 1960s and ’70s recorded a powerful time for the recently liberated country. As author Lia Wilson comments in her 2014 review, Sidibé’s photographs “chronicle a flourishing of human hope, ambition, and newfound opportunity” while remaining timeless. This article[…..]

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art

Marcel Broodthaers. Pense-Bete (Memory Aid), 1964; books, paper, plaster and plastic balls on wooden base, without wooden base; 11 13/16 × 33 1/4 × 16 15/16 in. Courtesy of the Collection Flemish Community, long-term loan S.M.A.K. © 2016 Estate of Marcel Broodthaers, the Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, SABAM, Brussels, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Andreas Petrossiants reviews Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In Marcel Broodthaers’ poem “Question de[…..]

From the Archives: Interview with Judith Bernstein

QUATTRO CUNTS 2015 Oil on Canvas 84 x 84 Inches

Today from our archives we bring you Elspeth Walker’s refreshingly blunt interview with painter Judith Bernstein. As we begin the new year and consider our plans for the next twelve months, it’s important to recall Bernstein’s philosophy: “[I]t’s important to be true to what you want to say and how you want to handle that. You have to keep moving forward. You can’t just stay where[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Whose Museum Is It Anyway?

Installation view of Mike Kelley at MoMA PS1, 2013. Photo: Matthew Septimus.

Here at Daily Serving, we keep an eye on the ways an exhibition’s impact changes depending on geographical location. With a recent editorial on what 30 Americans means in Detroit and December’s protest of omitting artists of color in Art AIDS America at the Tacoma Art Museum in mind, today we bring you Anuradha Vikram’s observations on shifting context, intended audiences, and racialized access to and[…..]

Best of 2015 – Margret: Chronicle of an Affair at White Columns

Margret: Chronicle of an Affair—May 1969 to December 1970, 2015; detail. Courtesy of White Columns / Delmes & Zander.

For today’s installment of our Best of 2015 series, regular contributor Ashley Stull Meyers writes, “To exhibit art by little-known or purposefully anonymous artists holds a cultish allure over the contemporary art world. In the curious case of Gunther K. and his mistress Margaret, a nearly fifty-year-old abandoned suitcase held archival ephemera too arresting for its maker’s obscurity to be institutionally relevant. Reading the review of[…..]

Drawing Sound Part II: Alvin Lucier at the Drawing Center

2.	Alvin Lucier. Bird and Person Dyning, 1975 (performance still); Drawing Center, New York; September 11, 2015; Alvin Lucier, performer. Courtesy of the Drawing Center. Photo: Chris Bradley.

To enter the main gallery at the Drawing Center for a recent performance, we couldn’t use its front doors. Instead, we had to descend the stairs near the lobby, walk along the lower-level corridor from the front to the back of the building, ascend the rear stairs, and pass through the smaller gallery called the Drawing Room. There, the walls were adorned with several wooden[…..]