Posts Tagged ‘New York’

Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers at the Museum of Modern Art

Teiji Furuhashi. Lovers, 1994; computer controlled, five-channel laser disc/sound installation with five projectors, two sound systems, two slide projectors, and slides (color, sound). Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art. © 2016 Dumb Type.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Yuting Bai reviews Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Standing solemnly as an apocalyptic coda to[…..]

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy: Broker at Postmasters Gallery

Jennifer & Kevin McCoy. BROKER (still), 2016; video, 28 minutes. Courtesy of the Artists and Postmasters Gallery. Photo: Evan Schwartz

The Postmasters Gallery’s arched storefront entrance on Franklin Street in New York City’s Financial District conjures an era long gone, when artists inhabited the raw lofts of the area. High ceilings with brick and rustic Corinthian columns belie the sleek high-rise trend seeping into the city, which aptly form the setting of Jennifer and Kevin McCoy’s latest exhibition, BROKER. Well-loved for their maquettes often featuring[…..]

Pedro Reyes: Doomocracy at the Brooklyn Army Terminal

Pedro Reyes. Lady Liberty, 2016; installation view, Pedro Reyes: Doomocracy, 2016. Courtesy of Creative Time, New York. Photo: Will Star Shooting Stars Pro

The word “doom” is frequently preceded by “impending” or “certain.” It implies finality—condemnation to a state of catastrophic ruin that overpowers any attempt to forge order and peace. In the case of Doomocracy, an immersive installation and performance in the form of a house of political horrors conceived by Mexico City–based artist Pedro Reyes, doom is employed as part parable and part prophesy—a way to[…..]

Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Sophia Al-Maria. Black Friday (still), 2016; digital video projected vertically, color, sound; 16:36. Collection of the Artist. Courtesy of Anna Lena Films, Paris, and The Third Line, Dubai.

In George Romero’s Dawn of the Dead (1978), a character posits that the zombies are flocking to the mall because of “[s]ome kind of instinct. Memory. It’s what they used to do. This is an important place in their lives.” As Romero’s zombies siege the mall, the filmmaker critiques consumerism and how it has penetrated the human condition. The mall acts as a refuge, housing[…..]

Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at the Met Breuer

Diane Arbus. Lady on a Bus, N.Y.C. , 1957; gelatin silver print; 14 x 11 in. Courtesy of The Met Breuer. © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Henry Rittenberg reviews Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at the Met Breuer in New York. I was not even a full sentence[…..]

Summer Session – Interview with David Levi Strauss

John Berger and David Levi Strauss, 2009. Photo: Yves Berger.

This Summer Session we’re going Back to School, and today we bring you an interview with David Levi Strauss by Amelia Rina. Rina had first been interviewed by Strauss in 2013 for admission to the School of Visual Arts’ MFA Art Writing and Criticism program, and here returns to speak with Strauss about his perspectives on writing, academia, and his role as an educator. Throughout[…..]

Summer Session – The Dark Side of Mickey Mouse: Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum

Llyn Foulkes. The Lost Frontier, 1997–2005; mixed media; 87 x 96 x 8 in. Courtesy of the artist and The New Museum

For this Summer Session topic of celebrity, today we bring you Allegra Kirkland’s review of the 2013 Llyn Foulkes retrospective at the New Museum. Across all of his multi- and mixed-media works, Foulkes’ oeuvre holds a special fascination for the hollow promises of fame implicit in American popular figures, like Mickey Mouse and Clark Kent. His heavily textured style viscerally manifests the darkness beneath the saccharine[…..]