Posts Tagged ‘New York’

#Hashtags: Whose Museum Is It Anyway?

Installation view of Mike Kelley at MoMA PS1, 2013. Photo: Matthew Septimus.

#access #institutions #race #class #performance #intersectionality Two major New York exhibitions this winter have raised the question of access to contemporary art and museums in important and divergent ways. Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art at the Studio Museum in Harlem continues reframing the historical narrative to include African Americans, as begun in Part 1 at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery. Mike Kelley’s sprawling retrospective[.....]

Nicola Hicks at Flowers Gallery, New York

Nicola Hicks; Banker II, 2009; bronze, 79 x 37 x 63 inches. Courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

Nicola Hicks’ recent sculptural tableaux, depicting humans, animals, and frightful crossbreeds of towering stature, exemplify art’s ability to produce rich, nonverbal worlds. Though the works on view at Flowers Gallery are classified merely as plaster (to be cast in bronze upon purchase), they in fact begin with wire skeletons that the British artist then stuffs with a mélange of straw and dirt before coating. This[.....]

Rituals of Rented Island at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Julia Heyward, God Heads, performance part of “Performances: Four Evenings, Four Days” at the Whitney Museum of American Art, February 28, 1976. Courtesy the artist

Peggy Phelan said it best: “Performance’s only life is in the present.”[1] Slippery in designation and impermanent by nature, a performance is not the same as the video of a performance. The viewer must be present for not only the sights and sounds of the performer, but also the smell, the temperature, the crowd, the fidgeting in a folding chair, or standing on a concrete[.....]

Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938 at MoMA

René Magritte. La clef des songes (The Interpretation of Dreams), 1935; Oil on canvas, 16 1/8 x 10 5/8 in. © Charly Herscovici. Photo: Jerry Thompson

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, pays homage to the quintessentially Surrealist decade in the career of Belgian painter Rene Magritte with Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-38. Surrealism flourished as the preeminent art movement between World Wars I and II in Europe. The MoMA exhibition, traveling to Houston and Chicago in 2014, showcases Magritte’s prolific Brussels and Paris years and proves the[.....]

Yayoi Kusama: I Who Have Arrived in Heaven at David Zwirner

Yayoi Kusama. Manhattan Suicide Addict, 2010-present; Video projection and mirrors; overall dimensions vary with each installation. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner.

Still working in feverish catharsis at the age of 82, Yayoi Kusama is Japan’s most famous living artist. Yet in the United States she has only recently received a slice of the recognition that her expansive body of work and visionary approach deserve. Following a critically acclaimed retrospective at the Whitney last year, Kusama was picked up by David Zwirner in early 2013. For her[.....]

Liam Gillick and Louise Lawler: November 1 – December 21 at Casey Kaplan Gallery

The simply titled exhibition November 1 – December 21, on view at Casey Kaplan Gallery in New York, pairs works by artists Liam Gillick and Louise Lawler. Sharing the space of Kaplan’s Chelsea gallery, Gillick’s cut aluminum text pieces dangle from wires attached to the ceiling while Lawler’s almost filmic photographs cling neatly to the walls. Though they occupy the same space, the works of these[.....]

#Hashtags: The Ethnicity Exhibition

Lorraine O’Grady. Untitled (Mlle. Bourgeoise Noire and her Master of Ceremonies enter the New Museum),
1980–83, printed 2009. Gelatin silver print. 7 1/4 x 9 1/4 in. Courtesy the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York.

#race #ethnicity #gender #institutions #access #identity Since the Civil Rights Era, it has become commonplace for marginalized ethnic communities to instate their own institutions of sociological and cultural study such as university Ethic Studies departments and museums like Brooklyn’s Museum of Contemporary African Diaspora Arts. In the face of extreme prejudice and exclusion from the discourses of history and art, many have felt the necessity[.....]