Posts Tagged ‘Painting’

Artist Project: Mediated Morandi

Michelangelo Antonioni. La Notte, 1961 (film still); 02:02:00. Courtesy of Nepi Film and Lopert Pictures Corporation (USA).

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Mediated Morandi, a project by Will Brown—the moniker of the San Francisco-based collective of Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, and David Kasprzak. This essay was commissioned by guest editor Jonn Herschend as part of Issue 5.5, Slapstick and the Sublime, and originally published on July 10, 2014. Will Brown is a collective that experiments with various modes of exhibition making while researching and manipulating histories as a part[.....]

Fan Mail: Geoffry Smalley

Geoffry Smalley. Early Morning at Cold Spring, Across Home Run Cove, 2014; acrylic on book page; 12 x 9 inches. Courtesy the artist.

Geoffry Smalley’s work is rooted in early-19th-century American painting, deriving specific scenes and techniques from historical canvases and the Hudson River School. In 1836, painter Thomas Cole completed his five-part series The Course of Empire. The series documents Cole’s vision for the birth, life, and death of western civilization, from the pastoral to the desolate. Cole had a calculated optimism for life and renewal, but[.....]

Fan Mail: Gabriel Liston

Gabriel Liston. Their Efforts Are In Vain, 2011; oil on linen; 14 x 16 inches. Image courtesy of Plus Gallery.

When describing his paintings, Gabriel Liston often uses words commonly associated with cinematic film creation: shot and frame, story and sketch, backstory and narrative. Many of his works—small paintings rendered in black-and-white or color—depict scenes from real events taken from the artist’s life. However, once painted, these moments from Liston’s life—due in part to their modest scale and a pervasive illusory quality—become surreal vignettes, yet[.....]

Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible at the Berkeley Art Museum

Forrest Bess. Bodies of Little Dead Children, 1949; oil on canvas; 6 x 7 5/8 in. The Menil Collection, Houston. Photo: Paul Hester.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maria Porges reviews Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible at the Berkeley Art Museum in Berkeley, California. Forrest Bess (1911–1977), a talented, visionary artist whose work was exhibited in[.....]

Fan Mail: Chris Rusak

Chris Rusak. Rhetoric, 2013; acrylic on fiberglass; 9 x 10 x 7/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Painting and collage are processes composed in layers—often opaque in nature, each altering or shrouding its antecedent. Traditional two-dimensional compositions begin with a canvas, then some form of underpaint, followed by a series of strata—at times scraped away and at others built up—that eventually form a composition that becomes an entirety greater than the sum of its parts. Chris Rusak’s newest works, a series called[.....]

Eric Yahnker: Sticks and Drones at Paradise Row Gallery

Eric Yahnker. Crimea River, 2014, charcoal, graphite and ink on paper, 40 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

The cleverly titled Sticks and Drones at Paradise Row Gallery is Los Angeles-based artist Eric Yahnker’s London debut. On entering the gallery, viewers are confronted with Daddy Issues (2014), a crudely carved wooden cobra with the words “Daddy Issues” lovingly wood-burned into its hood. With a sequined magenta bow on the middle of its head, it’s the Honey Boo Boo of county-fair handicrafts. “Daddy Issues”[.....]

Visual Markers: Interview with Dushko Petrovich

Dushko Petrovich. El Oso Carnal (in progress), 2012-present; acrylic on paper, 108 x 90 in.

I first met Dushko Petrovich in 2013 at the “Painting Expanded” symposium at the California College of the Arts. In his brief presentation and in the panel discussion that followed, it was clear that Petrovich is a thoughtful artist not afraid to question his own and others’ artistic practices. This quality is also evident in the publications he co-produces with Roger White, the art journal Paper[.....]