Posts Tagged ‘Painting’

Jake Longstreth: Free Range at Gregory Lind Gallery

Jake Longstreth. Free Range, 2014; Oil on canvas in artist frame, 60 x 40 in.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Miguel Arzabe reviews Jake Longstreth: Free Range at Gregory Lind Gallery in San Francisco. For urban dwellers with the means and motivation to leave the city in[…..]

Shaping Abstraction at the de Young Museum in San Francisco

Oskar Fischinger. Rhythmic Tapestry, 1952; oil on canvas; 17 1/4 x 22 1/8 in. Courtesy of the Harriet and Maurice Gregg Collection of American Abstract Art and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Emily Swaim reviews Shaping Abstraction at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, California. Full disclosure—I have embarrassingly little education in abstract art. In fact, I chose[…..]

Palermo: Works 1973–1976 at David Zwirner Gallery

Blinky Palermo. Ohne Titel (Untitled), 1973; primer, oil, fabric, and wood; 98-7/8 x 26-3/8 x 3-5/8 inches.

Palermo: Works 1973–1976, now on view at David Zwirner’s 20th St. gallery in Chelsea, speaks at close range. Unlike the gallery’s concurrent solo exhibitions—devoted to Suzan Frecon and Alice Neel—there’s no mounting symphony behind this selection of works by Blinky Palermo. The exhibition has moments of real depth, but situated between the abundance of the Frecon and Neel shows, it is in danger of functioning[…..]

Clayton Colvin: New Way to Forget at beta pictoris

Clayton Colvin. Frontiersman, 2014; Acrylic, charcoal, pigment, and india ink
on linen on panel; 46 by 56 in.

Today, from our friends at BURNAWAY, we bring you a review of Clayton Colvin’s solo exhibition at beta pictoris gallery in Birmingham. Author Brett Levine notes, “[The exhibition] represents a strong commitment to the practice of painting as much as to its meaning.” This article was originally published on February 4, 2015. In “new way to forget,” Clayton Colvin’s third solo exhibition at beta pictoris gallery, we see the[…..]

Fan Mail: Dene Leigh

Dene Leigh. Identify (someone or something) from having encountered before, 2014; oil on linen; 51 x 62 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Dene Leigh paints, constructs, combines, and assembles his work using traditional and old-master techniques to confront the neurological conditions of human memory. With a mixture of found and trompe l’oeil representations of objects, Leigh creates works that push the boundaries of collage, painting, assemblage, and installation. Many of Leigh’s works deal specifically with the neuropsychological disorder called agnosia, which struck Leigh’s grandfather late in life[…..]

Chris Ofili: Night and Day at the New Museum

Chris Ofili. The Adoration of Captain Shit and the Legend of the Black Stars (Third Version), 1998; oil, acrylic, polyester resin, paper collage, glitter, map pins, and elephant dung on linen; 96 x 72 in. Courtesy of the Artist; David Zwirner, New York/London; and Victoria Miro, London.

Night and Day at the New Museum is the first retrospective of the artist Chris Ofili in the United States. While the show incorporates sculptures and drawings, it unmistakably showcases the artist’s bravery, skill, and reinvention in painting over the past thirty years. The six bodies of work that span three floors are fearlessly distinct; clearly this is an artist who has no interest in[…..]

Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art

Jean-Michel Basquiat. Charles the First, 1982; acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas; three panels, 78 x 65 in. Courtesy of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, New York © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an assessment of Jordana Moore Saggese’s new monograph, Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art. Of Basquiat’s work, reviewer Anton Stuebner notes: “[the] canvases require viewers to […] recognize that the boundaries of pictorial representation, like language, can be redefined and reformed.” This article was originally published on October 7, 2014. The mythology around Jean-Michel Basquiat continues to proliferate in[…..]