Posts Tagged ‘Painting’

Fan Mail: Darren Reid

Darren Reid. Sunrise, I left you Sleeping, 2015; acrylic on canvas; 62.9 x 33.4 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Darren Reid’s journey into his current painting practice could be described as fortuitous. Four years ago, the self-taught artist found himself in a sad predicament. He needed to either put his dog to sleep or commit to giving her a shot of insulin every eight hours. In choosing the latter, Reid found his life transformed into a restrictive cycle of caretaking that meant he was[…..]

Best of 2015 – Help Desk: Selling Out

Installation view: Tony Conrad. Two Degrees of Separation, Kunsthalle Wien 2014, Photo: Stephan Wyckoff: Grommet Horn, ca. 1970, Replik 2014, Courtesy the artist and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne

Today we kick off our annual Best Of series with a selection from senior editor Vivian Sming: “Bean Gilsdorf hits the nail on the head once again in her Help Desk article on ‘selling out.’ As an artist, there will always be certain opportunities that come knocking on your door that cause you to raise an eyebrow. In part, we may carry some sort of guilt[…..]

Frank Stella: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Frank Stella. Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985; oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum; 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The stylistic shift in Frank Stella’s work has been met with fierce criticism, to say the least. Much has been written recently about his current retrospective at the Whitney, trying to connect his wildly expressive, three-dimensional works of the past few decades with his singular striped paintings of the 1960s. More than thirty years ago, Douglas Crimp characterized Stella’s late work from the 1970s as[…..]

Chris Johanson: Equations at Altman Siegel

Given the cartoonlike basis of most of his portrayals, the slackerly compositions, and the seeming arbitrariness of the surface textures of the paint he uses so dynamically as a set of color choices (seemingly clumsy elements that have often been similarly deployed by other artists who might pass as “outsider,” however relative that term might be), the question arises as to why Johanson chooses to so often paint rather than draw. In these pieces Johanson doubles down on painting in several ways: first, through the large scale of several of the scenes, as with Lecture Series/Abstract Mass, and the bleak consumer composite suburbia of Los Angeles with Pills. Johanson paints on repurposed wood panels and displays most of his work in awkward, large, built wooden armatures to show off both fronts and backs equally (as he has done even more elaborately in installations elsewhere). This prominently shows off the wooden buttressing behind the panels, which he also highlights with “secondary” paintings on the reverse. These include what look like a series of painted geometric doodles mosaic’d on the back of one larger composition, a simple set of color fields of darker and lighter brown parceled out by the different wood elements themselves, and what looks like a beginning painted sketch of an abstract landscape not so dissimilar to what might show up elsewhere as just one among many background components in a “primary” or finished painting by Johanson on the front of one of his panels.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Brian Karl’s review of Equations at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Johanson eschews in this set of paintings the strategy of inserting text directly into the worlds he creates. The titles of the pieces do some of that work.” This article was originally published on November 30, 2015. In this exhibition of ten new works (all[…..]

Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway Is a Disco at ARNDT Singapore

Del Kathryn Barton. The highway is a disco, 2015; Acrylic on French linen; 240 × 180 cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Arndt Singapore.

Framed against a starlit sky, two female figures with feathered hair and large, limpid eyes sit astride blue and purple kangaroos. Their lush, naked bodies are stark white against a vibrant canvas of marks, lines, and dots. They stare out of pictorial space into an unknown distance, with their detached gazes separated from the viewer’s own perusal of them. Disengaged from us, their distance forms[…..]

How Iraqi Are You?

Hayv Kahraman. Curfew, 2015; Oil on linen. Courtesy the Artist and The Third Line.

From our friends at REORIENT, today we bring you a piece on the art of Iraqi-born artist Hayv Kahraman. Author Natasha Morris sat down with Kahraman at the Frieze Art Fair to talk about her research-based practice. Morris says “To attempt to read the dialogue between text and images in How Iraqi Are You? entails similar cognitive acrobatics, as tableaus of beautiful women hover over jokes about[…..]

From the Archives – Evan Gruzis: Shell Game at The Suburban

Evan Gruzis. Free Box, 2014; Textile dye and acrylic on canvas; 48 x 32 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Today from the archives we bring you Steve Ruiz’s review of Evan Gruzis’s Shell Game at the Suburban, Michelle Grabner and husband Brad Killam’s backyard gallery in Oak Park that pioneered the suburb’s role as a hub of Chicago alternative art spaces. Grabner’s gingham soccer ball, currently Issue 27 of THE THING Quarterly, offers up a playful rejoinder to Ken Johnson’s famous criticism of Grabner’s work as “soccer mom” art. The second[…..]