Posts Tagged ‘Painting’

Ellen Berkenblit at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Ellen Berkenblit. Pantherella Fine English Socks, 2015; oil, charcoal and paint stick on linen; 92 x 76 in. Courtesy of the Artist, Anton Kern, and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles. Photo: Adam Reich.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Claire Colette reviews Ellen Berkenblit at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles. On view now at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Ellen Berkenblit’s new paintings[…..]

John Isiah Walton: Rodeo at The Front

John Isiah Walton. Rodeo, 2016; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist and The Front. Photo: John Isiah Walton.

At first glance, John Isiah Walton’s exhibition Rodeo, now on view at The Front in New Orleans, seems innocuous, even playful, with paintings of bulls diving through Pepto-Bismol pink skies toward men, frozen in space. But after a closer look, a smiling cynicism arises from the works. We, the viewers, are implicated as voyeurs in a decades-old tradition that exploits imprisoned men for entertainment: the[…..]

Terra Incognita at Art@Archer

Brian Lucas. Seventh Sense, 2015; mixed media on canvas; 36 x24 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Art@Archer, Oakland. Photo: Garrett Caples.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Garrett Caples reviews Terra Incognita at Art@Archer in Oakland. In Terra Incognita at Art@Archer, Derek Fenner, Ava Koohbor, and Brian Lucas—who exhibited together last year at now-defunct Emerald[…..]

Ludmiła Popiel at Fundacja Arton

Ludmiła Popiel and Jerzy Fedorowicz. IN, 1979; emulsion on canvas; dimensions unknown. Courtesy of the Museum in Koszalin and the archive of Ludmiła Popiel and Jerzy Fedorowicz.

Curators of contemporary Polish art have a somewhat paradoxical responsibility: to present the most up-to-the-moment work that is in the process of developing a history, while attempting to also excavate and frame the history of artworks produced during the last seventy years. As Poland expands its participation in the global contemporary art scene, it must also find a way to present the critical art-historical lineage[…..]

Fan Mail: Darren Reid

Darren Reid. Sunrise, I left you Sleeping, 2015; acrylic on canvas; 62.9 x 33.4 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Darren Reid’s journey into his current painting practice could be described as fortuitous. Four years ago, the self-taught artist found himself in a sad predicament. He needed to either put his dog to sleep or commit to giving her a shot of insulin every eight hours. In choosing the latter, Reid found his life transformed into a restrictive cycle of caretaking that meant he was[…..]

Best of 2015 – Help Desk: Selling Out

Installation view: Tony Conrad. Two Degrees of Separation, Kunsthalle Wien 2014, Photo: Stephan Wyckoff: Grommet Horn, ca. 1970, Replik 2014, Courtesy the artist and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne

Today we kick off our annual Best Of series with a selection from senior editor Vivian Sming: “Bean Gilsdorf hits the nail on the head once again in her Help Desk article on ‘selling out.’ As an artist, there will always be certain opportunities that come knocking on your door that cause you to raise an eyebrow. In part, we may carry some sort of guilt[…..]

Frank Stella: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Frank Stella. Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985; oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum; 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The stylistic shift in Frank Stella’s work has been met with fierce criticism, to say the least. Much has been written recently about his current retrospective at the Whitney, trying to connect his wildly expressive, three-dimensional works of the past few decades with his singular striped paintings of the 1960s. More than thirty years ago, Douglas Crimp characterized Stella’s late work from the 1970s as[…..]