Posts Tagged ‘Painting’

Science in Surrealism at Gallery Wendi Norris

Kurt Seligmann. Moonscape, 1959; oil on canvas; 48 x 36 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Sienna Freeman reviews Science in Surrealism at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco.  Gallery Wendi Norris’ current exhibition, Science in Surrealism, showcases 20 historic works from[…..]

Van Gogh on Demand: China and the Readymade

How to Paint van Gogh’s “Sunflowers.” Photos of Zhao Xiaoyong and apprentice, eight states of two van Gogh Sunflowers, oil on canvas, 20 × 24 in., 28 Oct.–6 Nov. 2008. Photos: Winnie Wong.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt from their Printed Matters column, a review of Winnie Won Yin Wong’s book Van Gogh on Demand: China and the Readymade. The review’s author, Jing Cao, makes note of the ramifications of Wong’s analysis: “In order to welcome ‘Chinese art’ into the global contemporary, the struggles within Chinese society for artistic legitimacy and the on-the-ground complexities of[…..]

Fan Mail: Zahra Nazari

Zahra Nazari. Inside Out Installation, 2014; acrylic on wood panel; 100 x 110 and 48 x 30 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Follow the white line back into the middle ground; it outlines a blue-gray pathway that comes to the front of the picture plane. The pathway entreats viewers to step into the architecture of Zahra Nazari’s surreal composition Landscape #14 (2013). Along the way, columns and a house abut the path, and as the line winds backward and diminishes, the horizontal pathway merges with a wall. Beyond[…..]

Peter Saul: Some Crazy Pictures at David Kordansky Gallery

Peter Saul. Singing Sandwich, 2014; acrylic on canvas; 60 x 72 inches. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

In an interview earlier this year, Peter Saul confessed, “I have to admit I’ve been enjoying myself. But through a large part of my life I’ve been desperately trying to think of some good reason for all this, and I haven’t really thought of a good reason. So that’s that.” Saul’s work is the kind that begs critics to ask, “But why?” while simultaneously and[…..]

Fan Mail: Lorella Paleni

Lorella Paleni. In Reverse, 2014; acrylic and oil on canvas; 42 x 48 inches. Courtesy of private collector.

Lorella Paleni is always creating something that exists just over the horizon of awareness. Her works comprise a series of visual heuristics to nowhere, showing the viewer a picture plan filled with rich colors that simultaneously push into and out of each painting. But instead of resolving compositional elements into a defined image, the elements of her style culminate in a delicately constructed form of[…..]

Theaster Gates: Freedom of Assembly at White Cube Gallery

Ground Rules (Scrimmage), 2015; wood flooring; 100 3/16 x 147 2/16 in. Courtesy of White Cube. Photo: Ben Westoby.

Freedom of Assembly is Theaster Gates’ second solo exhibition with London’s White Cube Gallery. Having won the Artes Mundi prize in January, Gates is currently receiving praise for his installation at this year’s Venice Biennale. Freedom of Assembly comes at a high point in the artist’s career, showing a new tendency to reflect and reconfigure, though by way of a comparatively conventional sculpture and painting show[…..]

Jacob Lawrence: Promised Land at the Cantor Arts Center

Jacob Lawrence. Ordeal of Alice, 1963; egg tempera on hardboard; 24 x 20 in. Gift of Dr. Herbert J. Kayden and Family in memory of Dr. Gabrielle H. Reem, 2013.98. © 2015 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy of the Cantor Arts Center, Palo Alto.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Lea Feinstein’s review of Jacob Lawrence: Promised Land at the Cantor Arts Center of Stanford University. Feinstein notes: “In drawing inspiration from iconic works of art history, Lawrence indicated that the stories he painted were part of the larger human context, not just specific to the African American experience.” This article was originally published on May 26, 2015.[…..]