Posts Tagged ‘Performance’

But What You Want Is Far Away at the Oakland Museum of California

Phoebe Osborne. God Sees Everything, November 7, 2014 (performance still); Courtesy of the Artist and the Oakland Museum of California. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

In God Sees Everything, directed and choreographed by Phoebe Osborne, a complex weave of everything Californian coalesces.

LA Department of Cultural Affairs Arts Development Fee Temporary Intervention!

Machine Project Still from LA Department of Cultural Affairs Arts Development Fee Temporary Intervention!

Today we bring you Machine Project’s video documentation of LA Department of Cultural Affairs Arts Development Fee Temporary Intervention!, a day-long series of performances conducted on or near the sidewalk in front of 11750 W. Olympic Boulevard in West Los Angeles. Machine Project describes the lineup as including, “synchronized group walking, improvised music, turkey blessings, professional sign twirlers, dance, experimental burden carrying, and non-traditional use of[…..]

The State in Which You Find Yourself: Mamela Nyamza and Meryem Jazouli

(Left) Mamela Nyemza leading a workshop at the 2014 TBA Festival. Image: Courtesy of TBA Festival. (Right) Meryem Jazouli. Photo: Agnes Mellon.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt from a conversation between artists Anna Martine Whitehead, Mamela Nyamza, and Meryem Jazouli. At the end of an interview that spans geography, race, performance, and limited resources, Jazouli notes, “If you are an artist [here], it’s as though you are different than everyone. But an artist should be talking about the world and what’s happening in the world[…..]

#Hashtags – Locating Techonology: Therapeutic Bodies

Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett, featuring Daisy Press. Whispering Pines 10, 2012; performance at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Courtesy of the Artist and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s consideration of performances by Mika Rottenberg and Shana Moulton. The author notes: “As early media artists and feminists have done, Rottenberg and Moulton construct imaginative narratives that probe the unsettling relationship between the body, screens, technology, and contemporary life.” This article was originally published on October 15, 2014. Mika Rottenberg’s and Shana Moulton’s absurdist[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Georgia Sagri is otherwise occupied

GEORGIA SAGRI, "Working the no work/Travaillez je ne travaille pas/Δουλεύοντας τη μη δουλειά," Whitney Biennial 2012, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Courtesy of the artist and Melas Papadopoulos, Athens. Copyright Georgia Sagri. Photo: Paula Court

Three years ago this week, Occupy protests had spread to over 851 cities in 82 countries. Today from our archives we bring you a look back at Carol Cheh’s consideration of Georgia Sagri’s practice in relation to the Occupy movement. Cheh reminds us: “The real point of Occupy, after all, was to occupy oneself and one’s own actions, to keep seeking ways out of the status quo,[…..]

Summer Reading: The Unlearning

Paulo Bruscky. Xeroperformance, 1980; Super 8 film on video. All images courtesy Galeria Nara Roesler

As the editors at Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts of our[…..]

Wojciech Kosma and Sjoerd Dijk at INTERSTATE

Wojciech Kosma and Sjoerd Dijk. Liberty is everything when it necessitates love for a human; promotional image. Courtesy of the artists and INTERSTATE projects. Image: Hayley Silverman.

As Wojciech Kosma burst into a spontaneous fit of tears on the concrete floor of INTERSTATE, his performance partner, Sjoerd Dijk, stroked the artist’s hair and waited for their performance to end. Where did these tears come from? And why didn’t I believe them? The–family, of which Kosma and Dijk are a part, is a performance collective that stages highly physical, improvised conversations that attempt[…..]