Posts Tagged ‘Performance’

Lorena Wolffer – Expuestas: Registros Públicos at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City

Antimemorias: enmiendas públicas, 2011; installation view, Lorena Wolffer Expuestas: registros públicos, 2015. Courtesy of Lorena Wolffer and Museo de Arte Moderno. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

Walking into Lorena Wolffer’s Registros Públicos at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City is a deeply unsettling experience. The space is tiny, just a few meters across, and the ceiling height is far closer to a bedroom than a gallery. Written in large red letters along the walls are a series of insults and threats from husbands and lovers to their partners–although using[…..]

Interview with Johanna Hedva

01_JohannaHedva

Johanna Hedva is a Los Angeles-based artist and writer whose recent piece She Work was performed at d e e p s l e e e p, a private apartment in Los Angeles, from July 11­–26, 2015. She Work is a queer adaptation of Euripides’ play Medea, in which Jason abandons Medea and their children, marrying a Greek princess to advance his political position. Medea[…..]

Drawing Sound Part II: Alvin Lucier at the Drawing Center

2.	Alvin Lucier. Bird and Person Dyning, 1975 (performance still); Drawing Center, New York; September 11, 2015; Alvin Lucier, performer. Courtesy of the Drawing Center. Photo: Chris Bradley.

To enter the main gallery at the Drawing Center for a recent performance, we couldn’t use its front doors. Instead, we had to descend the stairs near the lobby, walk along the lower-level corridor from the front to the back of the building, ascend the rear stairs, and pass through the smaller gallery called the Drawing Room. There, the walls were adorned with several wooden[…..]

Summer Reading – Notes to Self

Miguel Gutierrez. Age & Beauty Part 2, 2015; Performance view, January 14, 2015, Abrons Arts Center, New York. Photo: Ian Douglas.

As we near the end of our Summer Reading series, we bring you Claudia La Rocco’s meditations on the American Realness Festival. The author asks, “Playing to the intelligentsia for cheap laughs while the world burns: Does anybody still need to own this in 2015?” This article was originally published in Artforum on January 29, 2015. I’ve just deleted the three hundred words I’d written to start[…..]

Disguise: Masks & Global African Art at Seattle Art Museum

Brendan Fernandes. As One, 2015; HD video loop; 22:54 minutes. Courtesy of the artist.

Museums are constantly devising new platforms to present their permanent collections. Interventions and mining-the-museum have become commonplace curatorial strategies, and institutions frequently turn to contemporary artists to animate, recontextualize, and bring visibility to canonized cultural objects. Disguise: Masks and Global African Art is Seattle Art Museum’s latest attempt to draw connections across temporal, geographic, and cultural lines. Leveraging the museum’s collection of African masks, the[…..]

Evan Calder Williams: T-1 at Artists Space

Evan Calder Williams. T-1, 2015; performed at Artist Space on July 21, 2015.

Ice, compromised vision, and colonial geography: These formed the conceptual scaffolding that supported Evan Calder Williams’ live essay, T-1, performed at Artists Space on July 21, 2015.[1] Despite the three subjects’ ostensibly divergent histories, Calder Williams wove them into a complex web that expanded into several narratives that highlighted epiphanic and unexpected connections. The dynamic multimedia event—comprising video, text, and images projected on perpendicular screens,[…..]

Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art at YBCA

Senga Nengudi. R.S.V.P., 1975–78; nylon, sand, and mixed media; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Thomas Erben Gallery, New York.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. Author Brian Karl notes: “The urgent need to collect and re-present this work—not in a static archive but in a living arena—stems from the continuing conditions of marginalization, oppression, and worse that black people have suffered over[…..]