Posts Tagged ‘Photography’

Fan Mail: Matt Shallenberger

Matt Shallenberger. 2735 from the series False Pond, 2014; archival pigment print; 32 x 40 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Matt Shallenberger approaches his photographic subjects—most often landscapes—as a cartographer approaches a new territory. As he discovers information by following the sight lines of mountains, rivers, boundaries, horizons, and the ever-changing position of the sun or the moon, he always takes into account the history and prior records of his subjects. While he works consistently with darkened, blissfully moody vistas, Shallenberger’s research into his subjects[.....]

The Part in the Story Where a Part Becomes a Part of Something Else at Witte de With

Ahmet Ögüt and Cevdet Erek. Ahmet Cevdet Bey: “Jacket”, 2011.

The Part in the Story Where a Part Becomes a Part of Something Else is an exhibition that covers a lot of ground. The Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art brings together over fifty artists with multifaceted disciplines, but despite the large scale, the show can be distilled to a few threads that highlight the potential for art to create constructed moments. This underlying[.....]

Fan Mail: Holger Kilumets

Holger Kilumets. Trichromatic Vision Model, 2014; C-Type Print; 61 x 76 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.

Holger Kilumets is keenly aware of—and keen to explore—the conceptual and physical mechanisms of photographic representation. In a new body of work, Maps & Territories (2014), Kilumets uses visually witty vagaries to link a series of seventeen photographs that borrow tropes across subjects and structures—including art history, advertising, still life, television, theater, and film staging. Trichromatic Vision Model (2014), the second image in the series[.....]

From the Archives – Enrique Metinides: Chronicling Catastrophe

Mexico City, September 19, 1985 © Enrique Metindies, Courtesy 212berlin

Today from the DS archives, we bring you Allegra Kirkland’s review of Chronicling Catastrophe. Originally published on February 26, 2013, this article is a consideration of Enrique Metinides‘ fifty-year-long career in chronicling disasters that are, in Kirkland’s words, “anonymous crime [scenes] and hauntingly specific [tragedies].” Unfortunately, these images, and ones like them, are ever-relevant in our violent, modern world. The journalistic expression “If it bleeds, it leads” is particularly[.....]

Anthony Friedkin: The Gay Essay at the de Young Museum

Anthony Friedkin.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Susannah Magers reviews Anthony Friedkin: The Gay Essay at the de Young Museum in San Francisco.   The first question a show about documentary work made more[.....]

Marian Drew: Centrepiece at Turner Galleries

One of my favorite pieces in the National Gallery of Victoria is Édouard Manet’s 1880 work The Melon. At around 13 x 17 inches, it’s a modest study of a rather warty specimen, but I’m always tickled by the addition of an ornate gold frame far too large for the humble painting. It’s this incongruity that always draws me back to the gallery whenever I[.....]

Home and Away: Chien-chi Chang and Chen Chieh-jen at the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation

Chen Chieh-jen Realm of Reverberations, installation view at Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation image courtesy SCAF

The word “home” has elusive, slippery connotations. In Chinese, the character “jia” (家) also means “family.” It suggests notions of sanctuary, shelter, belonging. But for some the meanings are more complicated. For the marginalized, the outsiders, the lost ones in our midst, it reminds them of all that is missing. For others, in a world crisscrossed by a diaspora of dislocated people seeking safety and[.....]