Posts Tagged ‘Poland’

Summer Session – “Little Chance to Advance”: Why Women Artists in Academia Are Left Behind

Karolina Melnica. Celujacy (Excellent), n.d.; performance documentation.

Welcome to the first installment of our Summer Session topic “Back to School.” For this session we will be talking about art and the academy, exploring the unique opportunities, challenges, and problematics specific to academia. Today we bring you an article by Bean Gilsdorf reporting on the Katarzyna Kozyra Foundation’s study on the lack of women in positions of power within the Polish art academy. The foundation finds[…..]

‘Little Chance to Advance’: Why Women Artists in Academia Are Left Behind 

Karolina Melnica. Celujacy (Excellent), n.d.; performance documentation.

If you are currently attending or working in an academic arts institution, look around. What is the ratio of women to men in the student body? What proportion of the faculty is female? How many female faculty members are tenured? How many department chairs or deans are women? At many institutions, there is a visible disproportion between the number of women who are students versus[…..]

Ludmiła Popiel at Fundacja Arton

Ludmiła Popiel and Jerzy Fedorowicz. IN, 1979; emulsion on canvas; dimensions unknown. Courtesy of the Museum in Koszalin and the archive of Ludmiła Popiel and Jerzy Fedorowicz.

Curators of contemporary Polish art have a somewhat paradoxical responsibility: to present the most up-to-the-moment work that is in the process of developing a history, while attempting to also excavate and frame the history of artworks produced during the last seventy years. As Poland expands its participation in the global contemporary art scene, it must also find a way to present the critical art-historical lineage[…..]

Impossible Objects at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow

Impossible Objects, 2014; installation view, Impossible Objects, 2015. Courtesy of Instytut Architektury, Krakow. Photo: Jakub Woynarowski

Cultural reproduction is at the center of Impossible Objects, an exhibition that returns to Poland after much lauded recognition at the Venice Biennale. On central display is a 1:1 replica of the baldachin designed by Adolf Szyszko-Bohusz at the beginning of the 20th century to honor the revolutionary Polish leader Marshal Józef Piłsudski. The reproduction is accompanied by artist and artistic director Jakub Woynarowski’s large-scale[…..]

Halka/Haiti: The Polish Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale

C.T. Jasper, Joanna Malinowska. Halka/Haiti. 18°48’05”N 72°23’01”W. Polish Pavilion. 56th International Art Exhibition - la Biennale di Venezia, All the World’s Futures. Photo by Sara Sagui. Courtesy: la Biennale di Venezia.

On a dirt road surrounded by low buildings, the inhabitants of a remote village in Haiti gather for an unusual purpose. A cohort of Haitian musicians with string and brass instruments sit on folding chairs, tuning their instruments. At the center of this panoramic view are three performers, incongruous for their obvious European-ness, and for their 18th-century period dress. The orchestra commences, and the performers[…..]

Queering the Archive: When a Personal Act of Collecting Turns Political

Karol Radziszewski. Kisieland, 2012 (film still); High definition video; 30:00. Courtesy of the artist.

Today we bring you Queering the Archive: When a Personal Act of Collecting Turns Political, an article on queer art and activism in Eastern Europe recently featured on our sister site, Art Practical. Author Ela Bittencourt notes, “Kisiel’s slides…reverse the commonly accepted notion that there was no room for individual expression, least of all same-sex eroticism, in communist Eastern Europe. At the same time, their secretive circulation[…..]

Psychopaper at Piktogram

Ewa Ciepielewska (Luxus), untitled, 1984, watercolor, 99 x 68 cm. Courtesy of Piktogram/BLA, photo:

At 6 a.m. on December 13, 1981, General Wojciech Jaruzelski appeared on Polish television to declare martial law in effect throughout the country. Following his edict, for the next two and a half years citizens were stripped of their civil liberties: All borders and airports were closed, public gatherings were banned, independent organizations were declared illegal, and travel between cities required permission.[1] Curfew was imposed, and[…..]