Posts Tagged ‘political’

In ___ We Trust: Art and Money at the Columbus Museum of Art

Claire Fontaine. This Neon Sign Was Made By..., 2009; Back-painted neon, 6400k glass, cables, fixtures and transformers; 19 11/16 x 118 1/8 in. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. Photo: Erin Fletcher

Curator Tyler Cann’s In ___We Trust: Art and Money is a fresh and imaginative approach to exhibition-making. The title definitively removes higher moral or spiritual motives—so often claimed in art making—from the framework of the exhibit, and it seems especially fitting that Andy Warhol, a lover of all things material and monetized, opens the show. Hanging on the first wall are three works: the print One[.....]

Best of 2013 – #Hashtags: On the Political in Art

As we continue our Best of 2013 series, today’s pick comes from Bean Gilsdorf, who writes, “As the managing editor of Daily Serving, I get to work with over thirty super-talented authors from around the world, so it’s very hard for me to select just one article for this series. However, I really appreciate the energy that Anuradha Vikram has brought to writing and editing our[.....]

#Hashtags: The State of Art: Bangladesh, Portugal, Greece, and Palestine at the Venice Biennale

Joanna Vasconcelos. Valkyrie Azulejo, 2013. Handmade woolen crochet, fabrics, ornaments, polyester, LEDs and electric system. Dimensions variable. Portuguese Pavilion, 55th Venice Biennale. Courtesy of the artist and the Transtejo – Transportes Tejo, S.A., Lisbon. Photo by the author.

#politics #statehood #borders #biennials #nationalism The Venice Biennale is fundamentally shaped by its founders’ belief in statehood. Each nation-state secures its site, much like an embassy, and asserts its self-image through the choice of curators and artists. Four pavilions at the 2013 Biennale demonstrate how the notion of the nation-state is constructed and deconstructed in the face of contemporary global pressures. For Bangladesh, the pavilion[.....]

Personal Opinions

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L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast A weekly column by Catherine Wagley Driving home on March 28, the last day of the SCOTUS affordable health care hearings, I had the radio on and heard interviews with two or three female picketers who had set up outside the Supreme Court. I haven’t been able  to find the transcript of what I heard, but I remember[.....]

Fan Mail: Erin Rachel Hudak

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For this edition of Fan Mail, New York based artist Erin Rachel Hudak has been selected from a group of worthy submissions. If you would like to be considered, please submit to info@dailyserving.com a link to your website with ‘Fan Mail’ in the subject line. One artist is featured each month—the next one could be you! I have grown to love a television program entitled[.....]

History and Ownership: Interview with Johan Grimonprez

Johan Grimonprez, still from Dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y (1997). 68 minutes.

Too Serious for a Series

L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast A weekly column by Catherine Wagley There’s a video—one of many—that’s been circulating the web since last Friday. It’s called “Tsunami Hitting City of Kamaishi” and it lasts for a grueling four minutes and thirty-eight seconds. The first thirty seconds show a view of the Pacific coast that’s relatively calm, though overcast. Ships float by distantly and you[.....]