Posts Tagged ‘pop art’

The 5th Of July at Atlanta Contemporary Art Center

Installation shot of ‘The 5th of July’ (Far Left: Katherine Bernhardt’s Cantaloupe, iPhones, Nikes and Capri Suns (2014), Acrylic and Spray Pain on Canvas, 96 x 120 inches). Image courtesy of The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center (Atlanta, GA).

The symbolic charge of “the day after” marks itself as an interval structured by ambiguity as opposed to closure—a time of wake-up calls, hangovers, regrets, and comedowns. In science fiction, the phrase often suggests the apocalyptic nightmares of a world threatened by total disaster, while in revolutionary politics it articulates the call to reality after the collective euphoria from battle has worn away. It is[…..]

LOVE IV: Cold Shower at the Schinkel Pavillon

Anthea Hamilton and Nicholas Byrne. LOVE IV: Cold Shower, 2016; installation view, the Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin. Courtesy of the Artists and the Schinkel Pavillon.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Amanda Ribas Tugwell reviews LOVE IV: Cold Shower at the Schinkel Pavillon in Berlin. The fourth iteration of Anthea Hamilton and Nicholas Byrne’s LOVE series, Cold Shower packs[…..]

Ramiro Gomez: Domestic Scenes at Charlie James Gallery

Ramiro Gomez. Woman Cleaning Shower
in Beverly Hills
(after David Hockney’s
Man Taking Shower in
Beverly Hills, 1964), 2013. 
Acrylic on canvas. 36 x
36 inches. Courtesy the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Osceola Refetoff.

Ramiro Gomez’s show at Charlie James Gallery has been gaining a lot of attention for his topical use of visual politics to introduce labor and immigration issues into the art discourse. Most notably, Gomez appropriates the image of David Hockney’s iconic painting A Bigger Splash (1967) and a group of smaller Hockneys from the same period in his own paintings. The jubilant splash of Hockney’s[…..]