Posts Tagged ‘pop culture’

Jibade-Khalil Huffman: Kush Is My Cologne at Anat Ebgi

Jibade-Khalil Huffman. By The Author of Another Country and Nobody Knows My Name, 2017; transparencies in double light box; 35 x 31 x 6 1/8 in. Courtesy of Anat Ebgi. Photo: Michael Underwood.

Jibade-Khalil Huffman’s solo exhibition at Anat Ebgi, Kush Is My Cologne, lifts its title from a track on Gucci Mane’s 2009 major label debut, The State vs. Radric Davis. The allusion is one of many in Huffman’s exhibition that indicate his fixation with the popular nodes that drive contemporary cultural production, particularly, the profundity and cultural insistence of hip-hop in a world that often refuses[…..]

Cezary Poniatowski: No Center No Edges at Piktogram

Cesary Poniatowski. Untitled, 2016; acrylic on canvas, 180 x 145 cm. Image courtesy of Piktogram Gallery.

Cezary Poniatowski’s recent work at Piktogram Gallery compels viewers to navigate a veritable maze of pop-culture references and anthropological allusions. The exhibition is composed of more than twenty black-and-white acrylic paintings completed in 2015 and 2016, each depicting highly abstract, hybrid figures cavorting in confined, flat spaces reminiscent of comic-book panels. The recurrence of specific forms and motifs in the images creates the strong impression of a[…..]

Eric Yahnker: Sticks and Drones at Paradise Row Gallery

Eric Yahnker. Crimea River, 2014, charcoal, graphite and ink on paper, 40 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

The cleverly titled Sticks and Drones at Paradise Row Gallery is Los Angeles-based artist Eric Yahnker’s London debut. On entering the gallery, viewers are confronted with Daddy Issues (2014), a crudely carved wooden cobra with the words “Daddy Issues” lovingly wood-burned into its hood. With a sequined magenta bow on the middle of its head, it’s the Honey Boo Boo of county-fair handicrafts. “Daddy Issues”[…..]

Candice Breitz

    Currently on view in the exhibition Contemporary Outlook: Seeing Songs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, is the video installation, Queen (A Portrait of Madonna), by Berlin-based artist Candice Breitz. The piece assaults the museum-wanderer’s ears far before it is seen, a jumble of incomprehensible collective voices shouting through the MFA’s white walls. Only when one rounds the bend into the gallery[…..]