Posts Tagged ‘printmaking’

Bruce Conner: Somebody Else’s Prints at the Ulrich Museum of Art

Bruce Conner, Bombhead, 2002. Pigmented inkjet print on paper, 32 x 25 in. Courtesy Magnolia Editions, Oakland, CA. © 2014 Conner Family Trust, San Francisco / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Sympathetic magic—the use of a surrogate object to magically influence the person or circumstance it represents—has long been one of my favorite subjects. The Ulrich Museum of Art’s current exhibition, Bruce Conner: Somebody Else’s Prints, is an impressive collection of prints, etchings, and lithographs, a number of which Conner attributed to pseudonyms. The show inventively chronicles the artist’s use of surrogate figures for a variety of[…..]

Carving Through Borders at Galería de la Raza

Oree Originol. Untitled, 2014; wood, ink, and paper; 7 x 3 ft. Courtesy of the Artist and Galería de la Raza, San Francisco.

Congratulations to our partners at Art Practical on their sixth annual issue of Shotgun Reviews! Today’s review is from Matthew Harrison Tedford, who offers an assessment of the exhibition at Galería de la Raza in San Francisco: “At a time when the U.S. political system is failing to address immigration and when millions of American families risk being uprooted, Carving Through Borders offered a much-needed platform for conversation.” This article[…..]

Ronald Ventura: Recyclables

Ronald Ventura’s latest suite of works, produced at the Singapore Tyler Print Institute, examines how humanity relates to the environment, and how we often leave in our wake, a trail of destruction. Recyclables is Ventura’s show of lithographs, cast paper sculptures and paper relief on canvas produced from the discarded waste of urbanity, which he has recycled into a visual mélange of apocalyptic tales drawn[…..]

#Hashtags: Rejecting a Binary Argument with Toyin Odutola

Back in early March 2012, I reviewed Mark Bradford’s solo show at SFMOMA and learned shortly thereafter that the oft-repeated narrative about the circumstances of his early work—that he grew up in poverty in a depressed African-American neighborhood of Los Angeles—was simply not true (he was raised in Santa Monica, an affluent suburb). Given that I’ve heard this myth repeated even by knowledgeable curators, I[…..]