Posts Tagged ‘race’

#Hashtags – Toward the Black Museum

Hammer Projects: Simone Leigh, September 17, 2016–January 8, 2017. Installation view, courtesy of Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.

#museums #race #representation #institutional critique The recent controversy over Kelley Walker’s exhibition Direct Drive at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, and the departure of that exhibition’s curator, Jeffrey Uslip, was another reminder that museums are not built and programmed for all audiences alike. As this column has taken up questions of race in the museum on numerous occasions (and class in the museum, and[…..]

Fan Mail: Sarah Beth Woods

Sarah Beth Woods. A Big Diamond, 2016; hair weave, foam, door-knocker earrings; 67 x 7 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

True to its name, the BRAID/WORK series by Sarah Beth Woods operates within layers of social and material meaning, revealing a deconstructionist character even as it replicates the physical act of weaving. In the creation of these pieces, Woods pulls apart the concepts that make them legible. BRAID/WORK includes a 2016 performance and collaboration between Woods and the Malian-American professional hair braider, teacher, and entrepreneur[…..]

Renowned Feminist Art Historian Amelia Jones Believes that the Discipline of Art History Should be Restructured to Embrace New Narratives and Diverse Voices


This week, from our friends at Huffington Post, we bring you an article by artist and writer Jacqueline Bishop exploring the career of art historian Amelia Jones, who has long questioned and worked to challenge existing disciminatory structures as they relate to race, gender, and identity. Bishop quotes Jones, saying “From very early on I found myself interrogating the structures of the discipline, by asking such questions as, ‘Where[…..]

Albert Yowshien Kuo: Gonna Be Alright at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary

Albert Yowshien Kuo. Still Boxing, 2016; Oil and Mixed Media on Canvas; 70 x 66 in. Courtesy of Albert Yowshien Kuo. Photo: Albert Yowshien Kuo.

Albert Yowshein Kuo’s solo exhibition, Gonna Be Alright, at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary features three large paintings. In them, he depicts figurative tableaux that obliquely reflect social values such as race and gender. The paintings are familiar and unfamiliar, timeless and contemporary. To simply say that Kuo’s juxtapositions of figures and scenes is surreal would be too easy a summation. While painted in a traditional style[…..]

Black Chronicles II at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Unidentified Sitter. Edinburgh, c. 1900. Photographer/Studio: Alex Ayton Junior. Carte-de-visite, 64 x 100 mm. Courtesy of Val Wilmer Collection.

Born on the Danish island colony of Saint Croix with two generations of slaves behind him, the champion heavyweight boxer Peter Jackson cuts a lean and noble figure in his 1889 photographic portrait, his top hat perched level upon his head, his elegant Victorian garments pressed, his stylish accoutrements placed as evidence of his social persona as a gentleman–dandy. The portrait was taken just a[…..]

Help Desk: Institutional Bias

Robert Rauschenberg. White Painting [three panel], 1951; latex paint on canvas; 72 x 108 in.

Help Desk is where I answer your queries about making, exhibiting, finding, marketing, buying, selling–or any other activity related to contemporary art. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. I freelance in a museum in a major metropolitan area with a diverse population, but the racial demographics of the institution’s staffing seem glaringly segregated. The white​-​collar office employees are mostly[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Whose Museum Is It Anyway?

Installation view of Mike Kelley at MoMA PS1, 2013. Photo: Matthew Septimus.

Here at Daily Serving, we keep an eye on the ways an exhibition’s impact changes depending on geographical location. With a recent editorial on what 30 Americans means in Detroit and December’s protest of omitting artists of color in Art AIDS America at the Tacoma Art Museum in mind, today we bring you Anuradha Vikram’s observations on shifting context, intended audiences, and racialized access to and[…..]