Posts Tagged ‘race’

#Hashtags: Whose Museum Is It Anyway?

Installation view of Mike Kelley at MoMA PS1, 2013. Photo: Matthew Septimus.

#access #institutions #race #class #performance #intersectionality Two major New York exhibitions this winter have raised the question of access to contemporary art and museums in important and divergent ways. Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art at the Studio Museum in Harlem continues reframing the historical narrative to include African Americans, as begun in Part 1 at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery. Mike Kelley’s sprawling retrospective[…..]

Best of 2013 – #Hashtags: On the Political in Art

As we continue our Best of 2013 series, today’s pick comes from Bean Gilsdorf, who writes, “As the managing editor of Daily Serving, I get to work with over thirty super-talented authors from around the world, so it’s very hard for me to select just one article for this series. However, I really appreciate the energy that Anuradha Vikram has brought to writing and editing our[…..]

#Hashtags: The Ethnicity Exhibition

Lorraine O’Grady. Untitled (Mlle. Bourgeoise Noire and her Master of Ceremonies enter the New Museum),
1980–83, printed 2009. Gelatin silver print. 7 1/4 x 9 1/4 in. Courtesy the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York.

#race #ethnicity #gender #institutions #access #identity Since the Civil Rights Era, it has become commonplace for marginalized ethnic communities to instate their own institutions of sociological and cultural study such as university Ethic Studies departments and museums like Brooklyn’s Museum of Contemporary African Diaspora Arts. In the face of extreme prejudice and exclusion from the discourses of history and art, many have felt the necessity[…..]

#Hashtags: Divide//Conquer: Artists Confront the Gentrification of Urban Space

Mail Order Brides/M.O.B. (Jenifer Wofford, Reanne Estrada, Eliza Barrios). Manananggoogle, 2013. Multimedia installation including website and photographs. Commissioned by the San Jose Museum of Art with support from The James Irvine Foundation and MetLife Foundation.

#gentrification #displacement #race #class #technology #industry #neo-colonialism Any conversation among artists these days is bound to turn to the question of gentrification—the process of urban renewal by private developers that ultimately displaces poor residents in favor of the upwardly mobile. Modernism in art has always accompanied displacement of poor citizens from city centers, from the time of the Impressionists when Georges-Eugène Haussmann refashioned Paris, to[…..]

#Hashtags: The Art of Conquest

Key Lime

#institutions #race #jeffreydeitch #elibroad #lacma #moca #manifestdestiny #americanexpansionism Los Angeles museums have recently demonstrated the old adage that “nothing endures but change.” Since 2006, Michael Govan has been in charge of transforming the Los Angeles County Museum of Art from a Victorian-style encyclopedic museum into a powerhouse for contemporary art. During his tenure, Govan has recruited top American curators, including Franklin Sirmans and Christine Y. Kim, from privately endowed museums to his massive[…..]

#Hashtags: On the Political in Art

Thomas Hirschhorn. Gramsci Monument, 2013. Children's Class. Forest Houses, Bronx, New York. Courtesy Dia Art Foundation. Photo by Romain Lopez.

#race #class #access #commerce #representation #empowerment #codeswitching As the values of the contemporary art elite veer ever farther toward commerce, art with a social justice conscience is rallying in New York—arguably the center of the global art market. This summer, three prominent artists known for their political consciences have been drawing attention for thoughtful, research-heavy projects. In Chelsea, Hank Willis Thomas and the team of William Powhida and Jade Townsend have[…..]

#Hashtags: Photographing the Invisible: LaToya Ruby Frazier at Brooklyn Museum

Huxtables, Mom, and Me

#visibility #labor #institutions #class #race #access Photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier makes her New York solo debut with A Haunted Capital, a tightly crafted, personal-is-political installation at the Brooklyn Museum. The artist’s hometown of Braddock, a forgotten steel mill town in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, is marked by a geography of postindustrial degradation. An outsider might take a social documentary approach to Braddock’s history and current woes. As an insider, Frazier documents that[…..]